National Fisherman

The Loud Hailer

How to count fish

2015 1111 louydhailer countingfishWith New England’s low catch limits, groundfishermen are in trouble and the industry has been questioning the NOAA survey data used for stock assessments.


School for Marine Science and Technology researcher Kevin Stokesbury may have found a way to more accurately count fish populations by using underwater cameras to record fish passing through the open cod end of a net. These survey tows can last for hours while allowing fish to escape unharmed.


Stokesbury and his team have been working on this technology over the past three years, conducting fall and spring surveys with help from the fishing industry.


Don Cuddy, program director for the Center for Sustainable fisheries in New Bedford, joined the crew for the May 2015 survey and captured the experience on camera. The result is a fifty-minute film called Counting Fish that will give viewers an inside look at marine research.


A premier screening of the film is set to take place at the New Bedford Whaling Museum on Sunday, Nov. 22 at 1:30 p.m.


Don’t miss your chance to see how his tech experiments have evolved.


Seafood business 101

AlaskaSeaGrant logoThis week the Alaska Seafood Processing Leadership Institute is holding hands-on technical training in seafood processing and visits with local processors in Kodiak, Alaska.


Training topics include the science of seafood, shelf life, quality and safety of Alaska’s fishery products, product development, lean manufacturing, new technologies, and seafood marketing. Participants will receive hands-on experience in the pilot plant at the Kodiak Seafood and Marine Science Center, and local seafood plant managers will offer perspectives on the seafood industry and management.


After the Kodiak session, ASPLI participants return to their jobs and work with an in-house mentor to identify and complete a project that has an impact on plant operations.


For more information, visit the Alaska Sea Grant website.

Conferences & Events

No upcoming safety training events. Check back soon.


Eric Haynes’ Cod Cakes

  • 2 pounds 8-oz cod fillets, fresh if available
  • 4 ounces fresh bread crumbs
  • 2 ounces onion, diced fine
  • 1 ounces celery, diced fine
  • 1 ounces red bell pepper, diced fine
  • 1 ounces green bell pepper, diced fine
  • 2 tablespoons Italian parsley, chopped
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 oz. heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon Tabasco
  • Cooking oil or clarified butter as needed

Submit a recipe...

See all Recipes

Book Reviews

What’s on your list for summer reading? Well, let me suggest “A Mariner’s Miscellany” by Peter Spectre. It’s a collection of all things relevant and irrelevant concerning the sea, the whimsical and the serious; it’s about boats, ships, anchors, knots and ballast, the lore, poetry and language of the ocean and those who have traveled it.

2015 0526 Miscellany bookThough written in 2005, this collection is a timeless classic.Spectre has written several marine related books and did the yearly “Mariner’s Book of Days,” a nautical desk diary and calendar. He was also editor at International Marine, Wooden Boat and currently Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors. Those years spent writing about boats and correcting author’s notions of boats and the sea have endowed him with an eclectic mix of nautical knowledge.

For instance, does anybody know what “dogs running before their master” means? It’s a heavy swell in advance of a hurricane. That’s in the chapter “The Language of the Sea.”

In the same chapter is a listing of the “Different kinds of dead.”
Included is “dead horse” — a cash advance for wages to be earned, and “dead marine” — an empty beer bottle.

In the chapter “Bread is the staff of life; rum is life itself” is a recipe for Serpent’s Breath (a note says it’s enough for the entire crew):
1 bottle dark rum
1 bottle light rum
1 bottle Cognac
7 cups tea
3 cups lemon juice
1 ½ cups sugar

Stir the sugar and the lemon juice into the tea, then add the hard stuff. Allow the ingredients to meld for two hours — if you can wait that long.

If you are dumb enough to be at the wheel after sharing in that concoction, it won’t be long before you’re aground. But Spectre’s book tells you how to handle that situation in the chapter “Time and tide wait for no man.”

“If you should run aground on a falling tide and can’t get her off, climb over the side and scrub the bottom while you wait for the tide to return. Your friends will think you went aground on purpose.”

In the book’s 289 pages there’s a whole lot more, some of which you might know, most of which you never heard of. Check it out.

More Book Reviews:

See all Book Reviews

Inside the Industry

NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.


A new study has identified a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on.

Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species,  allowing responders to act faster to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
U.S. Canada Other

Postal/ Zip Code
© 2015 Diversified Business Communications
Diversified Business Communications