National Fisherman


Crew Shots Slideshow

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The Loud Hailer

Drill conductor course in Kodiak

AMSEAStandardLogoThe Alaska Marine Safety Education Association is offering a 10-hour course for commercial fishermen this weekend. The course meets U.S. Coast Guard drill conductor requirements for fishing vessels and contains an in-the-water practice session.

 

Instructors will cover cold water survival skills, firefighting, emergency drills and other at-sea emergency training.

 

When:
May 27-28

 

Where:
KSMSC - 118 Trident Way
Kodiak, Alaska

 

This workshop is free to commercial fishermen. You can register online.


Understanding oil spills

GOMA-logoNext month, the Gulf of Mexico Alliance is a hosting a seminar to help industry leaders better understand oil spills and the aftermath.

 

 

Topics will include impacts to water resources, habitats, wildlife and fisheries, and coastal resilience. Oil spill science educational resources and access to raw data and publications will also be shared. 

 

 

Presenters include  representatives from Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant, Florida Sea Grant, Louisiana Sea Grant and Texas Sea Grant

 

When:

Tuesday, June 14 — 2:00 to 4:00pm

 

Where: Louisiana room Hilton Capital Center 201 Lafayette St, Baton Rouge, LA

 

For more information and to register, visit the event website.

Conferences & Events

No upcoming safety training events. Check back soon.

Recipes

I love butter. As a child of the ’70s and ’80s, I was raised on margarine. But my grandmother, an Iowa farm girl, always infused her dishes with butter and lard, and I could taste the difference.

When it comes to seafood, I eat it all. I love the briny flavors of the ocean and don’t discriminate between shellfish, finfish, roe, seaweed. But if I had to choose a favorite, it would be scallops, the butter of the sea, churned by the tides and wrapped in a beautiful shell.

I am lucky to live by the ocean, close to the nation’s largest source of scallops. When Togue Brawn, who direct markets the local catch through her company Downeast Dayboat, mentioned that she was shipping scallops in a frenzy before the northern Gulf of Maine closed for the year, I jumped on it. How much? Well, she tells me, the guys are getting $17.50 off the boat. Would you pay $20 for a pound of the world’s freshest scallops to be delivered to your door? My next question was, “How much do you have left?”

2016 16 0519 ScallopsMost of the Atlantic scallops (Placopecten magellanicus) on the market are from trip boats, which go out for several days and keep their catch in ice. They deliver to the dock, which sells to wholesalers, which supply the markets. By the time you get the scallops home, they’re probably more than a week old. And still they’re some of the best food you’ll ever eat.

Now imagine you get those scallops within hours of their being plucked from the sea, the shucked meat has never touched ice or water. You may have had the best scallops of your life. But once you try them fresh off a dayboat, you’ll know you were eating margarine all along.

When it comes to seafood, this is the pinnacle for me. In my opinion, this dish requires no sauce. But for a little something extra, I enjoy this miso-honey glaze as a dip. I like to slide my fork into the sauce and then into the scallop.

Serves 4


Ingredients

1 pound scallops
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 pound pasta (spaghetti, linguine or similar)
1/4 cup grated parmesan
1/4 cup fresh arugula
Sea salt and fresh black pepper to taste
Lemon wedges to garnish

Prepare your pasta, drain and set aside. Pat your scallops dry with a paper towel. Heat a large heavy sauté pan on medium-high, then add the oil and butter. Sear scallops until caramel brown, 1-2 minutes per side. Set them aside on a warm (not hot) plate. Add the pasta to the scallop pan with the heat off. Toss with parmesan and arugula and serve alongside the scallops.


Honey Miso Sauce

Ingredients

4 tablespoons white miso paste
2 tablespoons warm water
1 tablespoon honey
1 scallion, greens only

Preparation

Stir miso and water together, add honey to taste and garnish with chopped scallion.


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Book Reviews

What’s on your list for summer reading? Well, let me suggest “A Mariner’s Miscellany” by Peter Spectre. It’s a collection of all things relevant and irrelevant concerning the sea, the whimsical and the serious; it’s about boats, ships, anchors, knots and ballast, the lore, poetry and language of the ocean and those who have traveled it.

2015 0526 Miscellany bookThough written in 2005, this collection is a timeless classic.Spectre has written several marine related books and did the yearly “Mariner’s Book of Days,” a nautical desk diary and calendar. He was also editor at International Marine, Wooden Boat and currently Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors. Those years spent writing about boats and correcting author’s notions of boats and the sea have endowed him with an eclectic mix of nautical knowledge.

For instance, does anybody know what “dogs running before their master” means? It’s a heavy swell in advance of a hurricane. That’s in the chapter “The Language of the Sea.”

In the same chapter is a listing of the “Different kinds of dead.”
Included is “dead horse” — a cash advance for wages to be earned, and “dead marine” — an empty beer bottle.

In the chapter “Bread is the staff of life; rum is life itself” is a recipe for Serpent’s Breath (a note says it’s enough for the entire crew):
1 bottle dark rum
1 bottle light rum
1 bottle Cognac
7 cups tea
3 cups lemon juice
1 ½ cups sugar

Stir the sugar and the lemon juice into the tea, then add the hard stuff. Allow the ingredients to meld for two hours — if you can wait that long.

If you are dumb enough to be at the wheel after sharing in that concoction, it won’t be long before you’re aground. But Spectre’s book tells you how to handle that situation in the chapter “Time and tide wait for no man.”

“If you should run aground on a falling tide and can’t get her off, climb over the side and scrub the bottom while you wait for the tide to return. Your friends will think you went aground on purpose.”

In the book’s 289 pages there’s a whole lot more, some of which you might know, most of which you never heard of. Check it out.


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Inside the Industry

The Southeast Alaska Fishermen’s Alliance recently announced that the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation has awarded the organization a Hollings Grant to reduce whale entanglements in Alaska salmon fisheries by increasing the use of acoustic whale pingers to minimize entanglements in fishing gear.

Read more...

Last week, Alaska senators Lisa Murkowski (R), Dan Sullivan (R) and Rep. Don Young (R) asked Secretary of State John Kerry to negotiate with Canadian leaders to make sure appropriate environmental safeguards are in place for mine development in Southeast Alaska.

The congressional delegation explained the importance of this issue to Alaskans and the need for assurances that the water quality in transboundary waters between Alaska and Canada will be maintained.

Read more...
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