National Fisherman


 

The Loud Hailer

Edible Magazine hits Alaska

2016 0622 edibleAlaskaEdible Magazine, a food-centric series that has over 80 city- and state-specific publications, now has one focused on Alaska.

 

According to Alaska Dispatch News, editor Mary Smith started distributing the first 40-page issue around Southcentral Alaska this week. She says 10,000 copies of the free quarterly magazine will be available all over Alaska.

 

The magazine will surely feature a lot of seafood and Smith says Alaska's food security challenges will be a constant theme.

 

For more information or to subscribe visit the magazine’s website.

 

 

 


Oregon Albacore Commission awarded education grant

ore albacoreThe Oregon Albacore Commission announced they have secured a Farm to School Grant from the Oregon Department of Education. The grant will support a boat-to-school culinary program for the Seaside School District to educate students on Oregon’s sustainable seafood and fisheries.

 

The one-of-a-kind program will go beyond just serving seafood to students. Students will be taught about five different locally sourced seafoods, starting with salmon in October. The five-pronged plan will include guest speakers throughout the year from the Oregon Albacore Commission, Oregon Trawl Commission, Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission, Oregon Salmon Commission, as well as fishermen from each fishery.



“We are excited to bring enthusiasm about seafood to Seaside’s youth and their families,” said Nancy Fitzpatrick, Executive Director of the Oregon Albacore Commission. “We are very tied to, and proud of, sustainably fishing this last truly wild and healthy form of protein.”

Conferences & Events

No upcoming safety training events. Check back soon.

Recipes

I recently stumbled across a recipe I posted years ago for halibut with spring vegetables and risotto. Before kids, my husband and I cooked together most nights. And when I read this recipe, I got a craving not only for fresh halibut but for a chance to prove to myself that we could make something like this on a weekday with two children crowding the kitchen. The reason being that timing on this recipe is best if one person is grilling while the other is stirring the risotto.

2016 0616 HalibutRisotto2I got lucky one beautiful spring night and jumped on making my risotto while the kids played outside. I also had a bunch of Swiss chard that had overwintered in the garden. My husband hopped on the grill and helped me pull this all together in less than 45 minutes.

This simple risotto is easy to make but does require attention. It’s worth it, though, to treat yourself to a grown-up version of macaroni and cheese — comforting, creamy and satisfying — that your kids will love, too.

I used Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), the largest of all the flatfish. A properly cooked fillet of Atlantic halibut is up there with the best steak I’ve ever had. There’s something about the ribbons of fat in these East Coast flatties that could turn a cowboy into a fish lover. If you’re not lucky enough to be able to find fresh halibut, feel free to substitute anything local that can stand up to the grill.

Serves 6

Ingredients

1 1/2 pounds of halibut fillet
1/4 cup olive oil, divided
1 medium sweet onion, chopped
1 1/2 cups arborio rice
6 cups chicken broth
1/2 cup parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons butter
Optional garnishes: parsley, lemon, chive, thyme and parmesan

Preparation

Brush your halibut in olive oil to coat, then sprinkle with salt and set aside. Pour the broth into a pan and warm over medium-high heat, then keep warm on low.

In a large sauté pan, warm 2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high heat, add the onion and sauté until lightly browned. Add a little more olive oil and the arborio, turning the heat down to medium. Stir and cook until the rice is just starting to get translucent at the edges of the grain.

Add a ladle of broth and cook, stirring, until the rice mixture absorbs the liquid. Add another ladle of broth and repeat until the rice is cooked through. In a pinch, you can cook the risotto until it’s almost done and set it aside, partially covered. Then rewarm to serve with another splash of broth within 20 minutes. I discovered this is just enough time to clean the slugs off of my garden chard, then chop and steam it.

Start grilling your halibut when you’re about 25 minutes away from serving. After your grill is heated on high, oil the grill itself and cook the fish, top side down for 3-4 minutes to get a nice sear (skip this step if you’re not feeling confident in your grill maneuvering). Then turn the heat to low, flip the fillet to skin side down, close the cover and cook for another 15-20 minutes. This was a 3-inch-thick piece and took a good 20 minutes on low. You can check for doneness by peeking between the flakes.

When the risotto is cooked through, add the parmesan and stir to incorporate, then add the butter and serve immediately with a squeeze of lemon, some fresh herbs and more parmesan. I like to put my fish right on top.

I love the contrast of vinegar-dressed greens with the grilled fish and cheesy risotto.


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Book Reviews

What’s on your list for summer reading? Well, let me suggest “A Mariner’s Miscellany” by Peter Spectre. It’s a collection of all things relevant and irrelevant concerning the sea, the whimsical and the serious; it’s about boats, ships, anchors, knots and ballast, the lore, poetry and language of the ocean and those who have traveled it.

2015 0526 Miscellany bookThough written in 2005, this collection is a timeless classic.Spectre has written several marine related books and did the yearly “Mariner’s Book of Days,” a nautical desk diary and calendar. He was also editor at International Marine, Wooden Boat and currently Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors. Those years spent writing about boats and correcting author’s notions of boats and the sea have endowed him with an eclectic mix of nautical knowledge.

For instance, does anybody know what “dogs running before their master” means? It’s a heavy swell in advance of a hurricane. That’s in the chapter “The Language of the Sea.”

In the same chapter is a listing of the “Different kinds of dead.”
Included is “dead horse” — a cash advance for wages to be earned, and “dead marine” — an empty beer bottle.

In the chapter “Bread is the staff of life; rum is life itself” is a recipe for Serpent’s Breath (a note says it’s enough for the entire crew):
1 bottle dark rum
1 bottle light rum
1 bottle Cognac
7 cups tea
3 cups lemon juice
1 ½ cups sugar

Stir the sugar and the lemon juice into the tea, then add the hard stuff. Allow the ingredients to meld for two hours — if you can wait that long.

If you are dumb enough to be at the wheel after sharing in that concoction, it won’t be long before you’re aground. But Spectre’s book tells you how to handle that situation in the chapter “Time and tide wait for no man.”

“If you should run aground on a falling tide and can’t get her off, climb over the side and scrub the bottom while you wait for the tide to return. Your friends will think you went aground on purpose.”

In the book’s 289 pages there’s a whole lot more, some of which you might know, most of which you never heard of. Check it out.


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Inside the Industry

The Downeast Salmon Federation has received a major grant from the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities to ensure and improve the water quality of eastern Maine’s most important rivers, according to the Ellsworth American.

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Louisiana crab fishermen and their catch are feeling the pressure of a downturn in the state economy, and a resulting upturn of people entering the fishery.

“It’s a crazy business right now,” said Pete Gerica, the New Orleans fisherman who now serves as president or the Louisiana Crab Task Force, a legislatively-created board of industry voices that makes recommendations to state government.

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