National Fisherman


The Loud Hailer

At-sea safety skills

WSG logo HighResYou never know what kind of injuries you might see while out on the water, so you had better be prepared.

 

Washington Sea Grant is hosting a Coast Guard approved first-aid safety course for commercial and recreational fishermen this month, so now is the time to check-up on your safety skills if you’re in the Seattle area.

 

Topics include CPR, patient assessment, hypothermia, cold-water survival, near-drowning, shock, trauma, burns, fractures, choking, immobilization techniques, and essentials for a good first-aid kit and more. Cost is $50. Space is limited, so contact organizer Sarah Fisken at sfisken@uw.edu OR (206)543-1225 to register.

 

When:

Friday, Feb. 26

8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 

Where:

Nordby Conference Room

Fishermen’s Terminal

3919 18th Ave. West

Seattle, WA 98119

 

For a full list of upcoming events, visit their online calendar.


 

B.C. mine talks in Anchorage next week

2016 0203 lh SalmonMiningeventScreenshot from the Salmon Beyond Borders website.Threats to Southeast Alaska’s salmon fishery by large-scale mine development in British Columbia will be explored on Monday, Feb. 8 at Alaska Forum on the Environment.

 

The forum will include Tribal and First Nations representatives, EPA Region 10 Administrator Dennis McLerran, state administration officials and others in a presentation.

 

Salmon Beyond Borders are also hosting an informal reception to increase awareness of the issues having the industry caused by mining. The reception will feature live music and a short film.

 

Alaska Forum on the Environment Panel
   


Transboundary Mine Review: How Alaska works with the Canadian Mine Review Process


Monday, Feb. 8 from 2:00 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.


Anchorage's Dena'ina Convention Center, 600 West Seventh Avenue

For more information, visit the forum website.

 

Taproot Reception and Informational Evening

Monday, Feb. 8 from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

TapRoot, 3300 Spenard Road

For more information, visit TapRoot's website.

 

Conferences & Events

No upcoming safety training events. Check back soon.

Recipes

05 Crab and Artichoke dipDownload a printable recipe card.This recipe was inspired by Super Bowl Sunday. But let’s be honest, there’s never a reason not to have a delicious dip on hand. I made the whole recipe and put just a cup of it in a small dish to cook. The rest I saved in the refrigerator for the weekend.

I use lump Maine Jonah or rock crab meat (yes, Maine has more than just lobster!), packed right around the corner from my husband’s childhood home. But you can use any local crab — Dungeness, blue, snow, stone — or white-meat shellfish in its place.

I like to serve this with crostini or pita chips, which you can make yourself (instructions to follow) or buy ahead. It would also be delicious on celery or corn chip scoops.

Serves 8

 

 

Ingredients

8 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
2/3 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons shallots or garlic, minced
A splash of Worcestershire sauce
1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
1 (14-ounce) can artichoke hearts, drained and chopped roughly
8 ounces lump crab meat
1 cup shredded smoked gouda cheese, divided
1/2 cup shredded parmesan cheese, plus a little for topping
Salt and pepper to taste

2016 0204 CrabDipPreparation

Set oven to 425 degrees.

In a medium bowl or stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment beat together the cream cheese, mayonnaise, shallots or garlic, Worcestershire and white pepper.

Stir in the artichoke hearts, crab, half the gouda and parmesan.

Season to taste and spread into several small oven-proof containers or one 8-inch skillet or baking dish. Bake until bubbly and golden on top, about 20 minutes. Serve with crostini or baked pita chips (instructions to follow).


Homemade crostini and pita chips

Ingredients

One small baguette
Two loaves pita bread
1 cup olive oil
Garlic to taste, pressed or minced

Preparation

Set oven to 350 degrees.

Slice the baguette into thin pieces, about a quarter inch in thickness, and set aside.

Slice pita bread around its edge, so you end up with two single circles, and each circle into six or eight pieces.

Combine garlic and oil in a bowl and lightly brush mixture on both sides of the bread with a pastry brush.

Arrange slices on two large rimmed baking sheets and bake until golden, about 15 minutes, checking halfway for even browning.

Serve warm or room temperature.


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Book Reviews

What’s on your list for summer reading? Well, let me suggest “A Mariner’s Miscellany” by Peter Spectre. It’s a collection of all things relevant and irrelevant concerning the sea, the whimsical and the serious; it’s about boats, ships, anchors, knots and ballast, the lore, poetry and language of the ocean and those who have traveled it.

2015 0526 Miscellany bookThough written in 2005, this collection is a timeless classic.Spectre has written several marine related books and did the yearly “Mariner’s Book of Days,” a nautical desk diary and calendar. He was also editor at International Marine, Wooden Boat and currently Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors. Those years spent writing about boats and correcting author’s notions of boats and the sea have endowed him with an eclectic mix of nautical knowledge.

For instance, does anybody know what “dogs running before their master” means? It’s a heavy swell in advance of a hurricane. That’s in the chapter “The Language of the Sea.”

In the same chapter is a listing of the “Different kinds of dead.”
Included is “dead horse” — a cash advance for wages to be earned, and “dead marine” — an empty beer bottle.

In the chapter “Bread is the staff of life; rum is life itself” is a recipe for Serpent’s Breath (a note says it’s enough for the entire crew):
1 bottle dark rum
1 bottle light rum
1 bottle Cognac
7 cups tea
3 cups lemon juice
1 ½ cups sugar

Stir the sugar and the lemon juice into the tea, then add the hard stuff. Allow the ingredients to meld for two hours — if you can wait that long.

If you are dumb enough to be at the wheel after sharing in that concoction, it won’t be long before you’re aground. But Spectre’s book tells you how to handle that situation in the chapter “Time and tide wait for no man.”

“If you should run aground on a falling tide and can’t get her off, climb over the side and scrub the bottom while you wait for the tide to return. Your friends will think you went aground on purpose.”

In the book’s 289 pages there’s a whole lot more, some of which you might know, most of which you never heard of. Check it out.


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Inside the Industry

The following was released by the Maine Department of Marine Resources on Jan. 22:

The Maine Department of Marine Resources announced an emergency regulation that will support the continued rebuilding effort in Maine’s scallop fishery. The rule, effective January 23, 2016, will close the Muscle Ridge Area near South Thomaston and the Western Penobscot Bay Area.

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Louisiana’s Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, which governs commercial and recreational fishing in the state, got a new boss in January. Charlie Melancon, a former member of the U.S. House of Representatives and state legislator, was appointed to the job by the state’s new governor, John Bel Edwards.

Although much of his non-political work in the past has centered on the state’s sugar cane industry, Melancon said he is confident that other experience, including working closely with fishermen when in Congress, has prepared him well for this new challenge.

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