On alert on shore

Fishermen fear that other stakeholders want to close off as much ocean as possible to fishermen and other users groups. The fishermen’s proposal advocates a less stringent alternative that protects marine species while still allowing fishing in as many areas as possible.

Back east, New York commercial fishermen said last week they’re opposed to new fishing regulations that could spring from a draft report developed by the New York Ocean and Great Lakes Ecosystem Conservation Council.

Fishermen dispute the report’s dire assessment of the state’s commercial fisheries. They say fisheries are not in peril and that fish stocks are in good shape; they question the science the report relies on.

Moreover, in order to protect the state’s natural resources, the council plans to recommend steps such as bans on fishing and establishing marine sanctuaries. Any further regulation, fishermen say, will imperil their livelihood.

The geography is different in both cases, but the fight is the same. Fishermen are battling to protect their livelihood. They’d rather be at sea than attending meetings ashore. But if they don’t speak up and voice their concerns, who will? If it keeps them fishing — now and in the future — it’ll be well worth the effort.

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