Book Review: Four Fish

But how do you reconcile our expectations for fully stocked supermarket shelves with a wild resource like fish?

One answer is that you don’t, that you simply replace unpredictable wild stocks with farmed product. In the last 30 years, farmed seafood has nearly overtaken wild fish in consumption in the United States, United Kingdom and Canada, and it is a trend that continues. The National Fisheries Institute reported that farmed tilapia bumped Alaska pollock down a notch to become America’s fourth favorite fish in 2010.

Is this inevitable, asks Paul Greenberg in “Four Fish”: “Must we eliminate all wildness from the sea and replace it with some kind of human controlled system or can wilderness be understood and managed well enough to keep humanity and the marine world in balance?”

To answer this question, Greenberg examines the histories and current conditions of four species that dominate the modern fish counter — salmon, sea bass, cod and tuna. Greenberg, an avid fisherman and thorough reporter, offers thoughtful ideas about what we need to do to ensure that our grandchildren can taste a fish that has swum in the open sea. You may not agree with all of his conclusions, but I believe his investigation is worth reading. — Melissa Wood

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