Fish KISS

And yet, the seafood-buying questions never seem to cease because people are often confused by different species, marketing names and origin labels. I am a label reader, but not everyone is. And I will admit that shopping with my toddler often makes it difficult to think outside the box.

I’ve learned to keep it simple, so my rule is wild, American and local. Always shoot for two out of three.

Berkowitz admits in his blog that it’s not easy to navigate the spectrum of farmed finfish. He says the onus is on chefs, restaurateurs and retailers to seek and find the best producers. But I rarely feel comfortable putting my faith in the person who is selling me something. Berkowitz might be an exception, but I could not in good conscience tell my friends and family to rely on any local restaurant to advise them on good seafood choices.

Even in my hyper-locavore town of Portland, Maine, at a restaurant with an excellent reputation I had a waitress tell me Laughing Gull shrimp was wild. It’s not. Nor is it farmed anywhere near here.

When I Googled it, I found an info link about this Caribbean shrimp on the Seattle Fish Co. site — in Denver. Now that’s a well-traveled shrimp.

I’d rather have mine plucked from waters I can swim in. Maybe I’ll add that to my rulebook.

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