Alaska salmon permit values drop

Values of Alaska salmon permits have taken a nose dive after a dismal fishing season for all but a few regions.

“No activity for drift gillnet or seine permits in Prince William Sound…No interest in Southeast seine or troll permits…Nothing new in Area M (the Alaska Peninsula),” wrote Mike Painter of The Permit Master. And so it goes –

“With the lone exception of Bristol Bay and Area M it was a pretty grim season for salmon fishermen all over the state, and we are seeing that reflected in the declining prices for salmon permits and very low demand,” said Doug Bowen of Alaska Boats and Permits in Homer. 

On the upside, Bristol Bay drift permits have rebounded to the $135,000 range after reaching a low of around $90,000 last fall and spring. But at this point, there’s not much interest.

“I believe there are fishermen who would like to switch out, say from Cook Inlet and go to the Bay, but it’s tough to make that move,” he said, adding that “Cook Inlet drift permits aren’t selling; there are lots of them on the market for around $50,000 and no action there.”

A few years ago, Prince William Sound drift gillnet permits were fetching up to around $240,000, but recent sales were in the $130,000 range or lower.

“Those permits have dropped about $100,000 in a year because they’ve had a couple of bad years in a row,” Bowen said.  

The story is similar for seine permits in the Sound, following a disastrous pink salmon year that came in less than 25 percent of the forecast.

“The market there is around $150,000 and they were up over $200,000 last year,” he added.  “We don’t see much action on those, and there is no interest for Kodiak seine cards. You can see them listed in the low $30,000 range but what it would take to actually sell one – my guess is it’s something under $30,000.”

In Southeast, some permit values are not down quite as much as in other areas.  Drift gillnets were priced at $95,000 to $100,000 last year, with recent sales at around $80,000. Southeast seine permits, which a couple of years ago approached $325,000, recently sold at $160,000.  

Bowen says it all adds up to very little optimism.

“Several of these areas have had bad years back to back. If you add it all up, there’s likely a couple hundred million dollars that did not show up in salmon this year. There’s not money floating around in the industry to buy permits, so we’re seeing a depressed market in general.”

He added that many stakeholders are worried about the future of Alaska salmon fishing.   

“You hear people talking about the water temperature is too warm and the fish are swimming deep and going under the nets and around them, and there seems to be a lot of concern about the future, even in the near term,” Bowen said. 

One bright note: salmon markets are going strong so far and that could help to turn the tide.

“Sales have been brisk this fall,” said Tom Sunderland, Vice President of Marketing and Communications for Ocean Beauty Seafoods. “We expect inventories to be low as we head into next season, and that should create some good market opportunities.”

Bowen added that with low prices now for permits nearly across the board, it’s a good time to buy.

 

About the author

Ashley Herriman

Ashley Herriman is the online editor for National Fisherman.

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