National Fisherman

National Fisherman - September 2013

NF sept13 cvr

Fisherman and filmmaker Jason Crosby is restoring a family heirloom wooden seiner in Port Townsend, Wash. Watch the progress and follow the story of the Genius, featured in National Fisherman's September issue.


On a collision course

From U.S. Coast Guard reports

One late June morning the skipper and sternman of a 43-foot fiberglass lobster boat were working about 20 miles from their northern New England home port until about 11:30 a.m. before heading north for home.


Gulf/So. Atlantic Spiny Lobster & Stone Crab

Strong prices and Chinese live market spark hope for return to winning ways

After rare back-to-back winning seasons in both fisheries, the 2012-13 Florida stone crab and spiny lobster harvests were a huge disappointment.

Crab claw landings dropped from 2.95 million pounds the previous season to 1.99 million for 2012-13, and value dropped from $26.7 million to $21.1 million, according to preliminary Fish and Wildlife Research Institute numbers.


Staying power

With diesel-electric and Z-drives, this 184-foot Bering Sea longliner sets a standard for efficiency

By Michael Crowley

"The original design started off as a conventional single-screw drive," says Ron van den Berg with Jensen Maritime Consultants in Seattle. If the boat's owners had followed through with that type of propulsion, the $25 million Northern Leader, which was built at J.M. Martinac Shipbuilding Corp. in Tacoma, Wash., wouldn't be generating nearly the interest that it is and wouldn't have such a high price tag.


Genius runs in the family

Washington fisherman documents restoration of an heirloom seiner

By Sierra Golden

Drive through the shipyard in Port Townsend, Wash., on a warm spring afternoon, and you'll find many commercial boats standing in various states of repair, the sunlight breaking through their rigging. Yard workers and boat owners are painting, fiberglassing, rebuilding engines and installing refrigeration systems. The sounds on the radio clash and meld with the dull thumping of metal on wood as workers pound new ribs into place on an old wooden seiner.


River dance

A spike in price complicates Maine's turbulent glass eel fishery

By Melissa Wood

For 10 weeks in spring Maine's riverbanks become a wild place. At night, the lights of headlamps dot the shores where, around the high tide, fishermen crouch with handheld dipnets or wade through river slough to check the baskets of stationary fyke nets. The week before I arrived Down East a shot had been fired in the air during a standoff. I heard stories of nets cut, stolen catches, and everyone, I learned, is packing heat.


Big deals

When I came around the corner to the dock at J.M. Martinac in Tacoma, Wash., where the Northern Leader was being completed this spring, I caught my breath. I knew I was going to be climbing aboard Alaskan Leader Fisheries' 184-foot Bering Sea longliner — the world's second largest — but there really is something enchanting about watching an innovative boat come to life.



41-footer is built rugged, just in case; lobster boat has a hydraulic tailgate

In Jonesport, Maine, the Audrey Lynne, a 41 Libby, recently left the shop of Norman Libby & Sons. The 41' x 15' 6" lobster boat is for Wyatt Beal of Frenchboro, Maine.


Inside the Industry

NMFS has awarded 16 grants totaling more than $2.5 million as part of its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

The program supports the development of technological solutions and changes in fishing practices designed to minimize bycatch and aims to to find creative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch, seabird interactions, and post-release mortality in federally managed fisheries.


Abe Williams, who was elected to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association board last spring, has been selected as the new president as of September.

Williams fishes the F/V Crimson Fury, and is president of Nuna Resources, a nonprofit that supports sustainable resource development in rural Alaska, including fighting for an international solution to issues raised by the proposed Pebble Mine project.

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