National Fisherman

National Fisherman - October 2009


Caught under the weather

Based on U.S. Coast Guard reports

The loss of a fishing boat from capsizing or sinking often occurs very rapidly. Severe weather can cause or exacerbate the emergency, leaving the crew little time to react — to save themselves or the boat. In bad weather, there is no replacement for easy access to safety gear and the training to don or deploy it quickly.


Gulf/South Atlantic Stone Crab

Slow economic recovery will dampen U.S. demand for tasty but pricey claws

Florida stone crab claws — at $35 or so a plate and clearly a luxury item — are sold domestically and dependent on tourism dollars. Consequently, the economic troubles of the past year are hitting the fishery hard.


While NOAA fiddles

This should be a time of promise for the U.S. fishing industry.

Although we certainly have a number of real concerns — Pacific salmon and Atlantic tuna come quickly to mind, albeit for different reasons, a number of stars seem to be in alignment.


Back to basics

Oregon's Fred Wahl turns out a no-frills 48-footer

By Michael Crowley

Most everyone has probably had the experience of going out to buy a simple, basic item — nothing fancy mind you, just basic. It might be an entry-level computer or a no-frills minivan to haul the kids around and run errands with.



A wheelchair secure tunaman; Maine lobsterman's first boat

Patrick Simmons, a Yarmouth, Maine, tuna fisherman finally got the boat he wanted. Simmons had been fishing out of a deep-V hull, a "roly-poly thing," says Bruce Farrin of Farrin's Boatshop in Walpole, Maine. Such a boat wasn't the best match for Simmons, who is disabled and operates in a wheelchair.


Inside the Industry

NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.


A new study has identified a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on.

Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species,  allowing responders to act faster to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
U.S. Canada Other

Postal/ Zip Code
© 2015 Diversified Business Communications
Diversified Business Communications