National Fisherman

Practicing to survive in cold water

A 37 1/2-foot steel vessel out of Sitka, Alaska, rigged for a combination of trolling and longlining, departed port on Wednesday, April 20, 2005, and anchored in Redfish Bay. The next morning, the vessel moved to fishing grounds approximately 23 nautical miles west of Cape Ommaney and began fishing.

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Northeast Oysters

Gulf scarcity and improving harvest plump up prices in the Mid-Atlantic

Anyone who needs a load of clamshells for their driveway is out of luck. But that could bode well for Delaware Bay watermen, as the shells are being snapped up to plant new shell beds in the bay, which are likely to yield more baby oysters.

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Show us your face!

Those of you who were regular readers of Alaska Fisherman's Journal will recall that each year the January issue featured crew shots.

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A crabber's life

How a Southern Californian became addicted to pursuit of the 'Deadliest Catch'

By Corey Arnold

It's happening again. After a 16-hour work day followed by a couple of grueling hours of chipping ice off the bow with a sledgehammer, the fingers on my left hand have frozen beyond a reasonable temperature for human flesh. Wet gloves now lie on the floor of the galley, and I hover over them in ice-layered oilskins with arms outstretched in front of the wall heater, awaiting the torturous flow of warm blood to arrive and expand my frozen vessels. Thawing is the worst part of the routine. It's a "getting your fingers pinched by a king crab" kind of pain, and the only comfort that keeps the eyes from tearing is knowing that it will all be over soon — yes, it will all be over soon.

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Northeast

Lobster boat gets more beam; Canadian boats big in Alaska

Late last fall, there was a meeting of boat owners who tie up their boats at the Cardinal Medeiros dock in south Boston. Steven Holler, a lobsterman from Quincy, Mass., who keeps his 42-foot November Gale at the dock, was attending the meeting and telling Chuck DiStefano, the owner of a charter boat, who also is good at making repairs to fiberglass boats, that he'd like to cut his wash rails back 7 inches to get enough deck space to carry 25 more traps. "It would be awkward, but I could do it," Holler said at the time.

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National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 12/16/14

In this episode, Bruce Buls, WorkBoat's technical editor, interviews Long Island lobsterman John Aldridge, who survived for 12 hours after falling overboard in the dead of night. Aldridge was the keynote speaker at the 2014 Pacific Marine Expo, which took place Nov. 19-21 in Seattle.

Inside the Industry

NOAA, in consultation with the Department of the Interior, has appointed 10 new members to the Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee. The 20-member committee is composed of individuals with diverse backgrounds and experience who advise the departments of commerce and the interior on ways to strengthen and connect the nation's MPA programs. The new members join the 10 continuing members appointed in 2012.

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Fishermen in Western Australia captured astonishing footage this week as a five-meter-long great white shark tried to steal their catch, ramming into the side of their boat.
 
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