National Fisherman

JACKSON – No two industries were more affected by the explosion in 2010 of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig than restaurant/hospitality and commercial fishing on the Mississippi Gulf Coast.

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Floating just a couple of meters above an oyster reef in Galveston Bay, two scientists working to improve the reef sifted through rock and shell pulled up from the bottom.

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"Live Crabs, $5.99 per pound" reads the sign hanging at Saltwater Seafood Market and Fry Shack in Raleigh, which on a good day sells 2,000 pounds of fish and shellfish.

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SEATTLE — A bitter fight over how much fish people eat — and thus how clean Washington waters should be — has pitted tribes, commercial fishermen and environmental groups against Boeing, business groups and municipalities.

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Beau Gillis landed a 219-pound halibut, fishing solo out of Freeport.

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Scientists, industry representatives and others interested in fisheries science, management and policy discussed all things bycatch at the Lowell Wakefield Fisheries Symposium in Anchorage May 13-16.

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"All the empty shells are the oysters that have died," Captain Ed Farley says. "But we do have some live oysters mixed in here." Farley bends to sort through the oysters on the deck of his skipjack, the H.M. Krentz. "This oyster bed," he tells the tourists assembled in front of him, "died in 1985 from the parasites that wiped out the rest of the area."

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It will come as no surprise that lobster is Maine's most valuable catch.

But the state's second most lucrative fishery, valued at around $35 million, is a mystery to most.

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PACIFIC OCEAN — Karl Peek, skipper of the commercial crabbing vessel Pacific Girl, was heading out of Grays Harbor with his crew in the morning to check gear May 6 when they saw a young humpback, nearly 40 feet long, resting on the surface of the water.

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I was managing environmental affairs at Cominco (now Teck) when I discovered Cominco owned Pebble. I was informed, upon inquiry, that Pebble was at best marginally economic because of low grade and other factors, and physically challenging because of water management. A no-go, so forget about it. Later, in 2002, I learned a shell company called Northern Dynasty (ND) had acquired Pebble so I checked out their parent company, Hunter Dickinson, a Vancouver "junior" mining company which was, according to their web page, not in the business of planning or building mines. Rather, they were in the business of discovering ore bodies and bringing them along to the "permitting stage" before selling them, none of which had ever resulted in a producing mine. This is a business model called "pump and dump" for which the Vancouver stock scene is infamous and once named by Forbes as the "scam capital of the world." Shortly after acquisition of Pebble, Northern Dynasty "discovers" a huge copper/gold mine that Cominco had missed, notwithstanding that Cominco was the most experienced northern miner in the world. Classic pump and dump. I forgot it again.

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Page 57 of 247

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 10/21/14

In this episode:

North Pacific Council adjusts observer program
Fishermen: bluefin fishing best in 10 years
Catch limit raised for Bristol Bay red king crab
Canadian fishermen fight over lobster size rules
River conference addresses Dead Zone cleanup

National Fisherman Live: 10/7/14

In this episode, National Fisherman Publisher Jerry Fraser talks about the 1929 dragger Vandal.

 

Inside the Industry

NOAA and its fellow Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have announced the signing of a formal Record of Decision to implement a gulf restoration plan. The 44 projects, totaling an estimated $627 million, will restore barrier islands, shorelines, dunes, underwater grasses and oyster beds.

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The Golden Gate Salmon Association will host its 4th Annual Marin County Dinner at Marin Catholic High School, 675 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Kentfield on Friday, Oct 10, with doors opening at 5:30 p.m.

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