National Fisherman

Area commercial fishermen could get a phone call asking about their fishing habits as part of a survey getting under way by the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries.

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It was unclear whether North Suffolk waterman Robbie Johnson was preaching to the converted during a Nansemond River Preservation Alliance on Tuesday.

A guest speaker at a packed alliance meeting in the Eclipse Ruritan Hall, Johnson told folks of his "armchair science" regarding the decline and recent resurgence of Nansemond oysters.

"Whatever makes common sense to me makes the most sense," Johnson declared of his methods.

Read the full story at Suffolk News-Herald>>

ORIENTAL — A Carteret County fisherman's trawler sank in Oriental Harbor Tuesday, resulting in an oil spill.

The Lady Barbara, a 71-foot shrimp trawler owned by Ralph Taylor of Marshallberg, sank in the harbor near Hodges Street, beside the docks of Garland Fulcher Seafood, after being docked since last summer with engine problems. Sherrill Styron, owner of the seafood company, said an oil spill boom was put around the boat to contain the spill as much as possible and absorbent pads were put out to collect the oil, while Mr. Taylor and the U.S. Coast Guard were called in.

"There really wasn't that much spilled," Mr. Styron said Thursday. "I think the situation's under control. There's just a sheen on water now."

Read the full story at Carteret County News-Times>>

Leading experts who are helping the state study and counteract rising ocean acidity levels are scheduled to speak at a free seminar Jan. 24 at Everett Station.

The Snohomish County Marine Resources Committee is hosting the event featuring speakers from the Washington State Panel on Ocean Acidification. The seminar is scheduled for 6 to 8 p.m. in Everett Station's Weyerhaeuser Room, 3201 Smith Ave.

"We're pleased to be able to help educate the public about ocean acidification," said Tom Hoban, chairman of the county Marine Resources committee. "The breadth of its effects has only been recognized within the last decade and most people have never even heard of it."

Read the full story at The Herald>>

Fisheries stock assessments have less than a one-in-five track record in predicting the potential catch, according to a study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The study, partly sponsored by NOAA and conducted at the University of Washington, concluded that fisheries managers need to start looking at environmental conditions that affect fish stocks and move more quickly to respond to natural or manmade changes that may have more of an effect than fishing does.

Only 18 percent of the 230 stock assessments examined had a clear connection between abundance and available catch, the study concluded. The rest point to other factors, to changes in the ocean environment and the behavior of fish.

Read the full story at Standard-Times>>

Gov. John Kitzhaber has repeated his promise to help gillnetters being moved off the main stem of the Columbia River.

But state Sen. Betsy Johnson and others are still not relieved by the comments.

The governor made the remarks at a gathering of Associated Press editors in Salem Tuesday. His remarks can be viewed in full in a video on The Daily Astorian's website.

Kitzhaber unveiled his proposed budget Monday, although it must be approved by the Legislature. It includes money for gillnetters to change their gear and some reimbursement for lost income, as well as investment in hatcheries.

Read the full story at Daily Astorian>>

After nearly a year of meetings and conversations with the Army Corps of Engineers, the Ventura Port District learned this week it will receive $2.5 million to dredge the Ventura Harbor, officials announced Wednesday.

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KAMOKAWA -- When Marty Kuller was growing up in Seward, Alaska, commercial fishermen walked tall, and little boys like Kuller looked up to them.

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ANCHORAGE, ALASKA — State prosecutors are disputing religious protection claims by Alaska Native fishermen cited for illegal fishing who say bans on their subsistence lifestyle violate their spiritual freedoms.

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The quest for funding to back a government declaration that the Northeast groundfishery and two others have economically failed for reasons not attributable to fishermen shifts now from what industry supporters see as an unsympathetic, Republican-led U.S. House to a more understanding Senate.

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Page 224 of 245

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 10/21/14

In this episode:

North Pacific Council adjusts observer program
Fishermen: bluefin fishing best in 10 years
Catch limit raised for Bristol Bay red king crab
Canadian fishermen fight over lobster size rules
River conference addresses Dead Zone cleanup

National Fisherman Live: 10/7/14

In this episode, National Fisherman Publisher Jerry Fraser talks about the 1929 dragger Vandal.

 

Inside the Industry

NOAA and its fellow Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have announced the signing of a formal Record of Decision to implement a gulf restoration plan. The 44 projects, totaling an estimated $627 million, will restore barrier islands, shorelines, dunes, underwater grasses and oyster beds.

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The Golden Gate Salmon Association will host its 4th Annual Marin County Dinner at Marin Catholic High School, 675 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Kentfield on Friday, Oct 10, with doors opening at 5:30 p.m.

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