National Fisherman

STOCKTON SPRINGS — Greg Perkins thinks of the thousands of pounds of lobsters and crabs that he’s caught in the Penobscot River over the past 10 years and worries about his family and the consumers he might have unknowingly poisoned with mercury.
 

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Bristol Bay produces about half the world's wild sockeye salmon supply and the world's largest, most valuable, sustainable, wild salmon fishery; runs average 20-40 million. According to the University of Alaska's Institute for Social and Economic Research, Bristol Bay's commercial fishery in 2010 created $1.5 billion in U.S. output and 10,000 full-time-equivalent jobs. Alaskans own the majority (1,474) of fishing permits and in 2010, about 7,000 people fished while 5,000 processed salmon. Bristol Bay salmon sustain lucrative recreational fisheries and represent food security for 25 rural Alaska Native villages and thousands of people. The commercial fishery has endured since 1884 and Alaska Natives have subsisted in-region for at least 4,000 years.
 

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Commercial fishermen tell WITN that they're concerned a historic fishery could be coming to an end.
 
There's a proposed ban over the fishing of river herring, because the fish stock is depleted.
 

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For months commercial fishermen have been complaining about steep reductions in what the federal government will allow them to catch in cod, haddock, and other groundfish in the Gulf of Maine.
 
Wednesday, charter boat operators became the newest group of fishermen complaining that federal policies are threatening to put them out of business.
 

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Around 100 tonnes of highly radioactive water have leaked from a storage tank at Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant, operator Tokyo Electric (Tepco) says.
 
The toxic water may have overflowed after a valve was left open by mistake, Tepco said.
 

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CHANCE — Among the oil cans, ailing rusty diesel engines and one beast of an air compressor in the workshop at Scott’s Cove Marina, mechanic Eldon “Chef Emeril” Willing creates culinary magic.
 

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PARKDALE, ORE. — People on the West Coast have counted on fish hatcheries for more than a century to help rebuild populations of salmon and steelhead decimated by overfishing, logging, mining, agriculture and hydroelectric dams, and bring them to a level where government would no longer need to regulate fisheries.
 

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FREEPORT - The Freeport Shellfish Commission is being urged to hire a regional shellfish coordinator to help solve problems that are threatening the area’s clamming industry.
 

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The latest pre-season 2014 projections for spring Chinook salmon, coho and fall Chinook salmon look awesome. Numbers projected for all three runs should produce outstanding fishing in the ocean, off the Washington coast and in the Columbia River.
 

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Give a man a fish, the adage goes, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime. But what happens when the one who needs fish is a fisherman?
 

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Page 23 of 179

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 4/22/14

  • OSU study targets commercial fishing injuries
  • Delaware's native mud crab making recovery
  • Alaska salmon catch projected to drop 47 percent
  • West Coast groundfish fishery bill passes
  • Maine's scallop season strongest in years

Brian Rothschild of the Center for Sustainable Fisheries on revisions to the Magnuson-Stevens Act.

Inside the Industry

The South Atlantic Fishery Management Council is currently soliciting applicants for open advisory panel seats as well as applications from scientists interested in serving on its Scientific and Statistical Committee.

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The North Carolina Fisheries Association (NCFA), a nonprofit trade association representing commercial fishermen, seafood dealers and processors, recently announced a new leadership team. Incorporated in 1952, its administrative office is in Bayboro, N.C.

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