National Fisherman

ROCK HALL — "So far it looks like a good season," Chuckie White said Friday, Oct. 4. "So far all I've heard is good news." After a poor crab season, working watermen are relieved to find plenty of oysters.

There have been no reports of dead or dying oysters, and prices are up because the Gulf Coast fishery is still crippled after the Deepwater Horizon oil well blowout in April 2010.

White is the president of the Kent County Watermen's Association. Working out of Rock Hall, he estimated, there are "10 or 12 boats, might be as many as 15 or 20 ... a few are still crabbing."

He said the recent crab season was a bad one and almost all the watermen have turned to catching oysters.

White said Eastern Bay is popular right now with local watermen fishing with hand tongs or patent tongs. "Diving looks pretty good" there too, he said.

"The divers are working where the power dredgers have been, that's where the oysters are in Eastern Bay," White said. "Every year more and more oysters show up on the bars they've been dredging."

Read the full story at My Eastern Shore MD>>

Federal fishing regulators have deep-sixed a strategy that sought to protect the harbor porpoise by closing more New England fishermen out of certain areas.

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All shrimp caught in Louisiana have been given a "red light" grade, an advisory that environmentally-conscious consumers not buy them, because of the state's policy on sea turtle protection.

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ANCHORAGE, ALASKA — The Alaska red king crab fishery that's featured on the popular reality show, "Deadliest Catch," faces an uncertain start because of the federal government's partial shutdown, and a late opening could have costly implications in Japan.

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The daily trip limit for the commercial harvest of vermilion snapper in the South Atlantic is reduced from 1,000 pounds gutted weight to 500 pounds gutted weight, effective 12:01 a.m. (local time) October 16, 2013.

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Before technology became a major asset to the shrimp processing industry in 1949, all shrimp peeling, washing, deveining and grading was done manually. In many cases, it was a long day of tedious and exhausting work for entire families. While men were dragging nets along the Gulf waters for fresh catch, women and children were in canning factories peeling shrimp by hand.

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With a pot of just $10 million to cover no doubt dozens of applications from fisheries groups and waterfront businesses from around the country, it may not be realistic to expect all seven of the proposals coming out of Gloucester to get federal funding.

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NEWPORT, Ore. — The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission has approved new fees for salmon, steelhead and sturgeon fishing in the Columbia River Basin.

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Another step has been taken towards getting Alaska's commercial salmon fisheries recertified as sustainable by the Marine Stewardship Council. Last fall the MSC sustainability certification of Alaska's commercial salmon fisheries was allowed to lapse after most of the major seafood processors that operate in the state pulled their support. However, the Purse Seine Vessel Owners Association stepped up to serve as the client for getting the fisheries recertified.

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The Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) and Alaska Ship & Drydock (ASD) have christened the first large commercial fishing vessel built in Alaska, the F/V Arctic Prowler.

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Page 206 of 318

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

It is with great sadness that Furuno USA announced the passing of industry veteran and long-time Furuno employee, Ed Davis, on April 30.
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Alaska Gov. Bill Walker is required by state statute to appoint someone to the Board of Fisheries by today, Tuesday, May 19. However, his efforts to fill the seat have gone unfulfilled since he took office in January. The seven-member board serves as an in-state fishery management council for fisheries in state waters.

The resignation of Walker’s director of Boards and Commissions, Karen Gillis, fanned the flames of controversy late last week.

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