National Fisherman

ANCHORAGE — A giant floating drill rig that ran aground a week ago on a remote Alaska island arrived as planned Monday in the shelter of a Kodiak Island bay after being towed about 45 miles through swells as high as 15 feet, officials said.

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LITTLE EGG HARBOR — In 45 years of operation, the Munro family never saw anything like the 30 inches of water in their marina's engine shop. But now they're worried it's the rules for rebuilding from superstorm Sandy that will put them out of business.

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Commercial gillnet fishermen have responded to Columbia River fish management changes with a legal challenge declaring the rules invalid.

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The New England Fishery Management Council at its upcoming January meeting is scheduled to consider drastic cuts in groundfish quota for the 2013 fishing year. The cuts will break the economic back of the groundfish industry and have a serious effect on the scallop industry because the scallop fleet catches groundfish stocks incidentally. As the scallop fleet is already scheduled to operate under reduced days at sea next year, reductions affecting scallop bycatch could further reduce scallop fishing.

The necessity of imposing the cuts is not clear. The council's scientific committee has had difficulties reaching consensus on the management of key stocks. The Council is faced with a dilemma. If the stocks are down and the cuts are necessary, how do we mitigate the impact of the cuts on the people who work in the fishing industry and fishing communities, and then how do we plan for the future? At the same time, if the stocks are not down and the cuts are not necessary, how do we promote stability within the fishing industry and fishing communities, and then how do we plan for the future?

To understand the council's short- and long-range plans on how to deal with its dilemma is crucial, particularly since the condition of the groundfish stocks may not be as bad as it seems.

Read the full story at Standard-Times>>

Prince William Sound topped all other Alaska regions for salmon catches last year – but not by much.

Fishermen in the Sound squeaked by their colleagues in the Panhandle by just 44 fish to get the #1 ranking for the 2012 season. The tally: 34,390,000 salmon crossed the docks at PWS compared to 34,346,000 for Southeast.

For the second year running, Southeast Alaska beat out Bristol Bay for the most valuable salmon catch. According to preliminary numbers from the state, Southeast landings totaled $153 million at the docks, compared to $121 million at Bristol Bay.

Read the full story at Stories in the News>>

A monster bluefin tuna has sold for a record-breaking $1.8 million in the year's first auction at Japan's Tsukiji fish market, nearly three times the previous high set last year.

The 488-pound fish, caught off Japan's northern city of Oma, fetched a winning bid of about $1.8 million (155.4 million yen), said an official at the Tokyo fish market.

The figure dwarfs the previous high of $638,905 (56.49 million yen) paid at last year's inaugural auction at Tsukiji, a huge working market that features on many Tokyo tourist itineraries.

Read the full story at The Weather Channel>>

MIDDLETOWN, N.J. — While Superstorm Sandy did highly visible damage to homes, boardwalks and roads, it also walloped the Northeastern fishing industry, whose workers are hoping for a small piece of any future disaster assistance that Congress might approve.

The storm did millions of dollars' worth of damage to docks, fish processing plants and restaurants. But it also caused millions more in lost wages to boat employees who couldn't work for two to three weeks, to truck drivers who had nothing to transport, and to other assorted industries that service commercial fishing.

The $9.7 billion measure to fund the National Flood Insurance program, passed by Congress on Friday, did not include anything for the fishing industry; a bill the Senate passed in December would have allocated $150 million for that purpose.

Read the full story at Portland Press Herald>>

BOSTON — New England fishermen and federal data reports are telling the same story this year: The catch is way down.

Two-thirds of the way through the 2012 fishing year, which ends April 30, fishermen have caught less than half their allotments on 14 of 16 species of bottom-dwelling groundfish.

For instance, fishermen have caught just a quarter of their allotment of cod on Georges Bank. And they've pulled home a scant 3 percent of the quota of haddock on Georges Bank. The catch on Gulf of Maine cod is down by about half.

Read the full story at Standard-Times>>

BATON ROUGE — The Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission took action to establish a 2,000 pound commercial trip limit for greater amberjack. The commission's actions Jan. 3 ensure that regulations in Louisiana state waters will mirror regulations of federally managed waters.

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NEWPORT — First, the season was delayed. Then, it was delayed again. And now that the Dungeness crab season is finally under way, the disappointments keep coming.

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Page 198 of 215

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 7/29/14

In this episode:

  • Dismal Kenai king return prompts closures
  • State, feds unveil salmon restoration plans
  • Slow start for Maine’s lobster season
  • Va. oyster harvest up 25 percent in 2013
  • Fishermen tangle lines in snapper battle

National Fisherman Live: 7/17/14

In this episode, National Fisherman's Boats & Gear Editor Michael Crowley talks with Mike Hillers about the Simrad PX Multisensor.

 

Inside the Industry

PORTLAND, Maine – The Maine Lobster Marketing Collaborative has appointed Matt Jacobson as its new executive director.
 
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The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will convene its Red Snapper Advisory Panel Wednesday, July 30, 2014, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the council office — 2203 N. Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, in Tampa, Fla. 

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