National Fisherman

The weeks leading to the holidays tend to be the most active for oyster poachers in the Chesapeake Bay, but the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and state police were hoping in recent days that new technology and harsher penalties would help them crack down on illegal oyster harvesting.
 

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The historical record makes it clear that the current New England groundfish fishery disaster is but one of many disasters that have threatened the industry over its 400-year history ("Our View: Complex fisheries need the best minds," Dec. 22). The fishery has endured chronic crises since at least 1789, when a delegation of vessel owners from Marblehead asked Congress for financial assistance to counteract the losses being suffered by the industry. At the time, Marblehead was the top fishing port in North America, but the number of boats had declined dramatically as profits fell. That request led to the "cod bounty," a subsidy to the groundfish fishery that remained in place until 1864. The repeal of the cod bounty is cited by historians as one cause of the "complete collapse" of the Maine fishing industry by 1890.
 

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Police in Lincoln City, Ore., say their search has been called off for a shrimp fisherman missing on Siletz Bay on the Oregon coast.
 

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A matrix of shallow, placid streams covers the vast, flat marshland at the mouth of Texas’ Colorado River as it empties into the Gulf of Mexico. Chewing on a plastic-tipped cigar, Buddy Treybig steers his shrimp boat through canals and into Matagorda Bay.
 

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BOSTON – State Senate Minority Leader Bruce Tarr, renewing his call to confront “serious threats to the survival of the groundfish industry in Massachusetts,” has filed legislation aimed at putting the state’s clout behind marketing seafood products.
 

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Alaska’s seafood industry worked hard again in 2013 to ramp up its message to policymakers, most of whom still tend to overlook the industry’s economic significance to the state and beyond. What is that message?
 
That “the industry” is made up of thousands of small businesses — the fishing boats that each supports one or several families.
 

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Two more areas off the coast become off-limits to fishing and other “consumptive” recreational pastimes and commercial fishing beginning Wednesday.
 

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Arctic and fisheries policies are intersecting in the Bering Sea, the "garden of Alaska," State Senator Lesil McGuire told the North Pacific Fishery Management Council this month, on behalf of the Alaska Arctic Policy Commission.
 

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AUGUSTA, Maine — Demand for Maine oysters is growing, but regulations on the cold-weather storage of the delicacy prevent some aquaculturists from accessing their stock during winter, depressing the supply.
 

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NOAA’s strategic management has received a scathing review in the most recent survey of federal worker satisfaction, and the agency’s overall standing among its employees declined for the fifth consecutive year in which the survey has been conducted.
 

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Page 170 of 309

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

Today Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) introduced legislation to extend a permanent exemption for incidental runoff from small commercial fishing boats.

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The National Working Waterfront Network is now accepting abstracts and session proposals for the next National Working Waterfronts & Waterways Symposium, taking place Nov. 16-19 in Tampa, Fla. The deadline is Tax Day, April 15.

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