National Fisherman

Combined research efforts by scientists involved in the Gulf of Maine Toxicity (GOMTOX) project, funded by NOAA's Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms (ECOHAB) program, and administered by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), have led to enhanced understanding of toxic algal blooms on Georges Bank.

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SITKA — Alaska fisheries officials concerned about the spread of an invasive marine species have denied federal and university researchers permission to study the organism's effect on herring eggs near Sitka.

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Proposed legislation that would allow Maine's groundfishermen to sell lobsters that they unintentionally catch in their trawling nets has led to some fierce debate among different sections of the state's fishing community. On one side are the fishermen, who have traditionally relied on harvesting flounder, pollock, haddock and other types of groundfish. With this fishery facing huge cuts, the ability to sell lobster bycatch to supplement the regular catch is regarded by them as a crucial source of additional revenue. But those who lobster for a living are opposed to the proposal. Tom Porter reports.

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This summer and fall, state officials are expecting strong numbers for salmon in Puget Sound and in Washington rivers. But you won't find much – if any – Washington salmon at farmers markets. You'll be buying Alaskan fish instead.

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POINT REYES NATIONAL SEASHORE, Calif. — Seen from a nearby hilltop, the Drakes Bay Oyster Company is a cluster of shacks with faded white walls. One patched roof appears at risk of being blown away by the next Pacific squall. A dozen workers on a small weather-beaten dock were busy handling a batch of oysters harvested on a recent morning, separating the mollusks on a single rusty conveyor belt.

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With the Belford Seafood Co-op as a backdrop, U.S. Congressman Frank Pallone Jr. (D-6th District) came to the Middletown shoreline Monday to talk about a bill that could help the storm-tossed fishing industry, still struggling to right itself after Sandy.

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In 1608, John Smith started mapping the Chesapeake Bay. However, it was very different from today's bay; the water was cleaner, the diversity of animals astounding and the landscape dominated by forests and marshes. Huge oyster reefs were plentiful throughout the bay and made navigation for Captain Smith difficult, leading to him remark that the oysters "lay as thick as stones."

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AUGUSTA — A proposal to allow fishermen to keep and sell lobsters they scoop up in trawling nets has rekindled an old debate between those who hope to revive Maine's groundfishing industry and lobstermen who guard the state's most valuable fishery.

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Absent from supermarket flyers this spring have been ads featuring the year's first fresh halibut, reflecting the anticipated pushback by buyers to the high-priced fish. "No excitement this year," said more than one major buyer.

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At a meeting last week of the St. Bernard Parish Council, life-long shrimper George Barisich, President of the United Commercial Fishermen Association urged the council to pass a resolution that supports the exemption of commercial fishermen from paying taxes on BP settlement money.

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Page 129 of 178

National Fisherman Live

Brian Rothschild of the Center for Sustainable Fisheries on revisions to the Magnuson-Stevens Act.

National Fisherman Live: 4/8/14

Inside the Industry

The South Atlantic Fishery Management Council is currently soliciting applicants for open advisory panel seats as well as applications from scientists interested in serving on its Scientific and Statistical Committee.

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The North Carolina Fisheries Association (NCFA), a nonprofit trade association representing commercial fishermen, seafood dealers and processors, recently announced a new leadership team. Incorporated in 1952, its administrative office is in Bayboro, N.C.

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