National Fisherman


The increasing numbers of bank anglers and powerboats on the Kenai River may be damaging the river habitat.

The Alaska Department of Fish & Game released two long-delayed reports in October addressing the effect of bank angling and powerboat use on bank erosion in the Kenai River. The reports, covering the years 2000 and 2001, found that as more anglers fished the river, the more banks crumbled and vegetation disappeared.

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Federal officials say money for some at-sea fishing monitors that had been expected to run out at the end of the year will extend into early 2016.

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One often overlooked public health need in the U.S. is to get Americans to eat more seafood. Unfortunately, the F.D.A.'s approval of genetically engineered salmon without labels may frustrate this goal by fueling consumer mistrust of aquaculture, or marine and freshwater farming.

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On good November mornings, Steve Dahl can pull 400 to 800 pounds of Lake Superior herring from his nets. But this was not a good morning.

Guiding his 18-foot herring skiff into the Knife River harbor, 15 miles up the shore from Duluth, Dahl figured he'd caught only about 20 pounds of the foot-long, silvery fish.

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Seattle firefighters rescued a worker who is lucky to be alive after falling 40 feet into the hull of a fishing vessel near the Magnolia Bridge Tuesday morning.

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Clearwater police are conducting a death investigation after a body was discovered in a crab trap Tuesday morning by a boater.

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A lobster fisherman is crediting his lifeguard training and safety courses for saving his life.

Nate King is one of three people who fell into the icy Atlantic Ocean on the first day of lobster season on Monday, leaving one dead.

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Norwegian energy giant Statoil has received approval to explore for oil in an area next to the Georges Bank and the entrance to the Gulf of Maine, raising environmental concerns on both sides of the border.

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Sometime in the next few years, an entirely new fish will appear on American plates. After several decades of biotech research and a final upstream push past the U.S. Food and Drug Administration last month, the AquaBounty AquAdvantage salmon, a genetically engineered species of fish, will go into commercial production. While modified plants like corn and soy abound in the American diet, this will mark the first time in history that an engineered animal has been approved for human consumption. The new fish’s genetic code is comprised of components from three fish: base DNA from an Atlantic salmon; a growth gene from a Pacific Chinook salmon; and a promoter, a kind of “on” switch for genes, from a knobby-headed eel-shaped creature called an ocean pout.

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Hawaii-based longline fishermen have exhausted multiple catch limits for ahi this year, but federal regulators said Friday a new agreement will ensure the fish will be available in the state through the holidays.

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Page 106 of 488

Inside the Industry

SeaWeb and Diversified Communications are accepting proposals to present at the SeaWeb Seafood Summit up until Friday, September 30.

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Governor Bill Walker has officially requested that the federal government declare a disaster for four Alaska regions hurt by one of the poorest pink salmon returns in decades.

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