National Fisherman

Not all Alaska pollock comes from Alaska.

Some of the fish, a source of deep pride for Alaskans, is harvested in Russian waters. Some is caught off the coast of Japan and Korea. But no matter its origin, federal regulations allow any walleye pollock distributed, sold, and consumed in the United States, whether in the form of fish sticks or a miso-glazed filet, to bear a label that calls Alaska home.

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The provincial government, the Fish, Food and Allied Workers (FFAW) union and fisheries scientists working with Memorial University of Newfoundland (MUN) think there is more to be said about the change in halibut stocks in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

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This fish story is criminal.

A federal judge sentenced Brooklyn fish dealer Alan Dresner to four months in prison Wednesday for his role in a $510,000 seafood scam.

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PORTLAND, Maine - The group that manages commercial fisheries in the Atlantic states is recommending a nearly 2,000-pound cut in the catch limit for glass eels in Maine.

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With the Columbia River fall Chinook salmon return nudging up close to the modern-day record, and a coho return much better than forecast in preseason, fishing was very good this late summer and fall on the lower river and elsewhere.

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ELLSWORTH, Maine — An Orland lobsterman who had his license suspended earlier this year for multiple fishing violations has pleaded guilty to fishing-related crimes in Hancock County, according to state officials.

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On the surface, the news that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will be steering $18 million in grants through the Saltonstall-Kennedy Act to fishermen and waterfront businesses in the coming year stands as a bit of good news amid a renewed sea of fisheries crises.

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The collision of fishing interests came Saturday night into Sunday morning, out along Jeffreys Ledge, ground zero for the extraordinarily hard bluefin tuna bite that unfolded in the waters off Cape Ann throughout the middle of October.
 

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Kerr Sulphurets Mitchell, a British Columbia mine in the transboundary Unuk River watershed that concerns many Southeast Alaska fishermen, Native organizations, tourism and environmental groups, has received early construction permits from the British Columbian government.
 

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A federal grand jury has filed an additional indictment against three Lower Keys brothers already facing charges of harvesting spiny lobsters from illegal habitat called casitas, catching more than their daily commercial bag limit, and falsifying commercial fishing reports to conceal their take.
 

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Page 105 of 349

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

NMFS announced two changes in regulations that apply to federal fishing permit holders starting Aug. 26.

First, they have eliminated the requirement for vessel owners to submit “did not fish” reports for the months or weeks when their vessel was not fishing.

Some of the restrictions for upgrading vessels listed on federal fishing permits have also been removed.

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Alaskans will meet with British Columbia’s Minister of Energy and Mines, Bill Bennett, when he visits Juneau next week and will ask him to support an international review of mine developments in northwest British Columbia, upstream from Southeast Alaska along the Taku, Stikine and Unuk transboundary rivers.

Some Alaska fishing and environmental groups believe an international review is the best way to develop specific, binding commitments to ensure clean water, salmon, jobs and traditional and customary practices are not harmed by British Columbia mines and that adequate financial assurances are in place up front to cover long-term monitoring and compensation for damages.

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