National Fisherman


Humans are dumping so much carbon dioxide into the oceans so fast that seawater -- even in the Gulf of Maine -- is getting warmer and more acidic, according to marine and climate researchers.

Scientists aren't sure yet how the trend, which is believed to be tied to human-induced climate change, will affect ocean life in the gulf. But there is rising concern -- especially among fishermen -- that changes in the ocean ecosystem could severely damage some of the fisheries that are the backbone of the region's seafood industry.

The effects of warming and acidification are showing up all over the world, including in and along the gulf.

"We've seen levels of acid that rival some of the highest levels recorded anywhere," said professor of marine science Mark Green, whose work at St. Joseph's College in Standish has focused exclusively on ocean acidification. "Many coastal areas are increasing three times faster than open ocean."

Read the full story at Portland Press Herald>>

Inside the Industry

The American Fisheries Society is honoring recently retired Florida Institute of Oceanography director Bill Hogarth with the Carl R. Sullivan Fishery Conservation Award — one of the nation's premier awards in fisheries science - in recognition of his long career and leadership in preserving some of the world's most threatened species, advocating for environmental protections and leading Florida's scientific response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

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The Marine Stewardship Council has appointed Eric Critchlow as the new U.S. Program Director. Critchlow will be based in the MSC US headquarters in Seattle. He is a former vice president of Lusamerica Foods and has over 35 years in the seafood industry.

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