National Fisherman


Humans are dumping so much carbon dioxide into the oceans so fast that seawater -- even in the Gulf of Maine -- is getting warmer and more acidic, according to marine and climate researchers.

Scientists aren't sure yet how the trend, which is believed to be tied to human-induced climate change, will affect ocean life in the gulf. But there is rising concern -- especially among fishermen -- that changes in the ocean ecosystem could severely damage some of the fisheries that are the backbone of the region's seafood industry.

The effects of warming and acidification are showing up all over the world, including in and along the gulf.

"We've seen levels of acid that rival some of the highest levels recorded anywhere," said professor of marine science Mark Green, whose work at St. Joseph's College in Standish has focused exclusively on ocean acidification. "Many coastal areas are increasing three times faster than open ocean."

Read the full story at Portland Press Herald>>

Inside the Industry

The New England Fishery Management Council recently elected Dr. John F. Quinn of Massachusetts and E. F. “Terry” Stockwell III of Maine to serve respectively as chairman and vice chairman in the year ahead. The two have led the Council since 2014 but reversed roles this year. 

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Vigor will debut an affordable 142-foot freezer longliner designed specifically for North Pacific fishing at the 2016 Pacific Marine Expo in Seattle.

 

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