National Fisherman

Not long before U.S. EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson resigned from President Obama's cabinet, it was revealed she spent years using a secret e-mail account to conduct official business. Under pressure, the agency has started releasing those e-mails, which provide a glimpse into how top officials at the agency worked to outmaneuver lawmakers and the press. But I found one of Jackson's e-mails particularly astounding and hypocritical, given the agency's apparent obsession with politics and PR spin.

"The public health and environmental laws that Congress has enacted depend on rigorous adherence to the best available science," Jackson wrote in a message to the agency's 17,000 employees. "That is why, when I became Administrator, I pledged to uphold values of scientific integrity every day." Jackson added that the EPA's decisions "should be arrived at independently using well-established scientific methods, including peer review, to assure rigor, accuracy and impartiality."

As a biologist in a much earlier career, I agree completely with these statements. But I found them shocking because under Jackson's leadership, the EPA has subjected the state of Alaska and the developer of the proposed Pebble copper mine to one of the most unscientific regulatory assaults in the agency's 43-year history.

Read the full story at the Daily Caller>>

Inside the Industry

NMFS has awarded 16 grants totaling more than $2.5 million as part of its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

The program supports the development of technological solutions and changes in fishing practices designed to minimize bycatch and aims to to find creative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch, seabird interactions, and post-release mortality in federally managed fisheries.


Abe Williams, who was elected to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association board last spring, has been selected as the new president as of September.

Williams fishes the F/V Crimson Fury, and is president of Nuna Resources, a nonprofit that supports sustainable resource development in rural Alaska, including fighting for an international solution to issues raised by the proposed Pebble Mine project.

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