National Fisherman

Not long before U.S. EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson resigned from President Obama's cabinet, it was revealed she spent years using a secret e-mail account to conduct official business. Under pressure, the agency has started releasing those e-mails, which provide a glimpse into how top officials at the agency worked to outmaneuver lawmakers and the press. But I found one of Jackson's e-mails particularly astounding and hypocritical, given the agency's apparent obsession with politics and PR spin.

"The public health and environmental laws that Congress has enacted depend on rigorous adherence to the best available science," Jackson wrote in a message to the agency's 17,000 employees. "That is why, when I became Administrator, I pledged to uphold values of scientific integrity every day." Jackson added that the EPA's decisions "should be arrived at independently using well-established scientific methods, including peer review, to assure rigor, accuracy and impartiality."

As a biologist in a much earlier career, I agree completely with these statements. But I found them shocking because under Jackson's leadership, the EPA has subjected the state of Alaska and the developer of the proposed Pebble copper mine to one of the most unscientific regulatory assaults in the agency's 43-year history.

Read the full story at the Daily Caller>>

Inside the Industry

The anti-mining group Salmon Beyond Borders expressed disappointment and dismay last week at Alaska Governor Bill Walker’s announcement that he has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with B.C. Premier Christy Clark.

This came just days after his administration asked members of his newly-formed Transboundary Rivers Citizens Advisory Work Group to provide comment on a Draft Statement of Cooperation associated with Transboundary mining.


NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.

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