National Fisherman

A group of celebrity chefs, including some of New Orleans' finest, sent a letter to Congress last week urging lawmakers to maintain a catch-share scheme for managing red-snapper stocks in the Gulf of Mexico, a move vehemently opposed by recreational fishing groups. Jeff Angers, president of the Center for Coastal Conservation, reacted strongly to the push by Susan Spicer of Bayona, Rick Tramonto of Tramonto Steak & Seafood and other chefs from across the country.

"I was disappointed to see some of the famous cooks of New Orleans take such an ill-informed stance," Angers said. "I would hope those who signed that letter would look for the facts of fish management rather than the propaganda of an environmental organization."

Catch shares are supported by the Environmental Defense Fund.

In general, catch shares seek to give commercial fishers permanent access to a predetermined portion of a fishery. The advantage is that those fishers, unbound by the strictures of traditional season openings and closings, can target the fish in their individual quotas whenever they wish.

Read the full story at St. Mary Now>>

Inside the Industry

It’s no secret that fraud is a problem in the seafood industry. Oceana repeatedly touts a mislabeling epidemic. While their method has been criticized, the perception of rampant fraud  has been established.

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The Center for Coastal Studies recently announced that Owen Nichols, Director of the Center for Coastal Studies’ Marine Fisheries Research Program, has been selected as this year’s recipient of the John Annala Fishery Leadership Award by the Gulf of Maine Research Institute. 

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