National Fisherman

After a 2012 Bering Sea snow crab season that saw unusually severe sea ice inhibit fishermen's efforts to catch almost 89 million pounds of the shellfish, 2013 is shaping up to be much friendlier.

According to Kathleen Cole, a forecaster with the National Weather Service ice desk, this winter was unlikely to match 2012, even before it began. Despite some recent rumors of encroaching ice into the Bering Sea fishery, the situation is better than last year, she said.

"We're just not going to have a year like last year. It's going to be, by no means, that bad," she said. "Last year was something that we'd never seen before, and hopefully something that we'll never see again."

The snow crab fishery season officially begins Oct. 15, but it doesn't really pick up until after the Bering Sea king crab fishery meets its quota, said Chuck Trebesch, a fisheries biologist in Dutch Harbor. The snow crab season continues until either the quota is met or it closes May 15.

By Tuesday, crabbers had already pulled in about 40 percent of this year's quota of about 66 million pounds, which is about 22 million pounds less than last year's maximum catch. Trebesch said the catch was "on pace."

Despite last year's larger quota, it was a tough season for crabbers as sea ice moved into the Bering Sea fishery grounds during January, clogging waterways and threatening already-deployed crab pots. It got so bad for so long that Fish and Game offered to extend the season, which stretched into June. Trebesch said that "it's too early to make any statements" on whether another extension might be needed this season.

While rumors of another bad ice year are, so far, unfounded, it doesn't mean ice isn't a factor, said Cole.

Read the full story at the Alaska Dispatch>>

Inside the Industry

NMFS has awarded 16 grants totaling more than $2.5 million as part of its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

The program supports the development of technological solutions and changes in fishing practices designed to minimize bycatch and aims to to find creative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch, seabird interactions, and post-release mortality in federally managed fisheries.


Abe Williams, who was elected to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association board last spring, has been selected as the new president as of September.

Williams fishes the F/V Crimson Fury, and is president of Nuna Resources, a nonprofit that supports sustainable resource development in rural Alaska, including fighting for an international solution to issues raised by the proposed Pebble Mine project.

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