National Fisherman

With strict new limits on Gulf of Maine cod, "there's not enough to sustain the fishery. The game is over."

Those words from Gloucester's Vito Giacalone, chief policy advocate for the Northeast Seafood Coalition, marked an all-too realistic assessment of the New England fishery's 2013 prospects after the New England Fishery Management Council shamefully gave its vote of approval to new Gulf of Maine cod cuts that will limit fishermen to landing just 23 percent of this year's quota. And there's real irony to that.

For it was Giacalone and the coalition, more than anyone else out of Gloucester, who have tried to work with the NOAA and its catch share and sector system — often with sharp criticism even within the industry. And it was Giacalone who, when the catch share system was first coming down the pike four years ago, encouraged others to work with the agency as well.

"This (system) is coming," Giaclone told a packed rally at City Hall that summer. "We can act like victims or rise up and figure out how to drive this thing. If you can't stop the bus, try to drive it."

Now, he and his coalition fishermen are indeed victims. Thanks to NOAA regional chief John Bullard's stand against extending current guidelines, and the council's devastating blessing of this travesty, Giacalone and all New England groundfishermen have been thrown under the proverbial bus Giacalone was talking about. An entire industry of hard-working fishing families has been devastated as NOAA and our federal Department of Commerce leadership carry out a clearly marked agenda of not only consolidating the industry for hostile, corporate takeover, but killing off the industry New England has known for centuries.

Read the full story at the Salem News>>

Inside the Industry

NMFS has awarded 16 grants totaling more than $2.5 million as part of its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

The program supports the development of technological solutions and changes in fishing practices designed to minimize bycatch and aims to to find creative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch, seabird interactions, and post-release mortality in federally managed fisheries.


Abe Williams, who was elected to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association board last spring, has been selected as the new president as of September.

Williams fishes the F/V Crimson Fury, and is president of Nuna Resources, a nonprofit that supports sustainable resource development in rural Alaska, including fighting for an international solution to issues raised by the proposed Pebble Mine project.

Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
U.S. Canada Other

Postal/ Zip Code
© 2015 Diversified Business Communications
Diversified Business Communications