National Fisherman


There continues to be no evidence that harmful levels of chemicals from the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill are in seafood, but initial study results show that former spill cleanup workers are carrying biomarkers of many chemicals contained in the oil in their bodies, and women and children along Louisiana's coast are reporting health effects believed linked to oil.

Those were some of the public health findings discussed Tuesday during the second day of the three-day Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science Conference, which is aimed at understanding the effects of pollution resulting from the spill and its effect on natural systems in the Gulf and along the shoreline, as well as on the people who live and work there.

Several studies described Tuesday also indicate a significant percentage of coastal residents are reporting continued mental health problems related to the spill, ranging from anxiety and depression to post-traumatic stress syndrome.

Read the full story at Times Picayune>>

Inside the Industry

(Bloomberg) — After fighting for more than two years to avoid paying almost $1 billion in oil spill damages to Gulf Coast shrimpers, oystermen and seafood processors it claimed didn’t exist, BP Plc has thrown in the towel.

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(Bloomberg) — Millions of dead fish stretched out over 200 kilometers of central Vietnamese beaches are posing the biggest test so far for the new government.

The Communist administration led by Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc has been criticized on social media for a lack of transparency and slow response, with thousands protesting Sunday in major cities and provincial areas.

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