National Fisherman

There continues to be no evidence that harmful levels of chemicals from the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill are in seafood, but initial study results show that former spill cleanup workers are carrying biomarkers of many chemicals contained in the oil in their bodies, and women and children along Louisiana's coast are reporting health effects believed linked to oil.

Those were some of the public health findings discussed Tuesday during the second day of the three-day Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science Conference, which is aimed at understanding the effects of pollution resulting from the spill and its effect on natural systems in the Gulf and along the shoreline, as well as on the people who live and work there.

Several studies described Tuesday also indicate a significant percentage of coastal residents are reporting continued mental health problems related to the spill, ranging from anxiety and depression to post-traumatic stress syndrome.

Read the full story at Times Picayune>>

National Fisherman Live

Brian Rothschild of the Center for Sustainable Fisheries on revisions to the Magnuson-Stevens Act.

National Fisherman Live: 4/8/14

Inside the Industry

The South Atlantic Fishery Management Council is currently soliciting applicants for open advisory panel seats as well as applications from scientists interested in serving on its Scientific and Statistical Committee.

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The North Carolina Fisheries Association (NCFA), a nonprofit trade association representing commercial fishermen, seafood dealers and processors, recently announced a new leadership team. Incorporated in 1952, its administrative office is in Bayboro, N.C.

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