National Fisherman

Food safety advocates are launching one final effort to stop the FDA from approving genetically modified salmon. It would be the first laboratory-created animal approved as food in America. Until now, all FDA approved GM or GE foods have been plants like corn or soybeans. But with the final FDA hurdle approaching, GE salmon could be heading to your plate very soon.

"The biotechnology industry says it has genetically engineered a fish that grows at twice the normal rate, so it can get to market sooner and make more money, faster," the consumer safety advocate Food & Water Watch says of genetically engineered salmon, "But this dangerous lab experiment is all hype and full of downsides to consumers, salmon growers and the environment." The group also points out that at least 30 House members and 14 US Senators have written to the White House expressing their opposition to the addition of GE salmon into the nation's food supply.

Emphasizing one of many concerns about creating a genetically engineered salmon species on such a large, industrial and commercial scale, Food & Water Watch quotes Denise Hawkins, PhD from the US Fish & Wildlife Service. In a statement describing the FDA's lack of data on the subject, he writes, "Maybe they should watch Jurassic Park."

Read the full story at the Examiner>>

Inside the Industry

The anti-mining group Salmon Beyond Borders expressed disappointment and dismay last week at Alaska Governor Bill Walker’s announcement that he has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with B.C. Premier Christy Clark.

This came just days after his administration asked members of his newly-formed Transboundary Rivers Citizens Advisory Work Group to provide comment on a Draft Statement of Cooperation associated with Transboundary mining.


NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.

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