National Fisherman

The New England Fishery Management Council delayed a decision yesterday on drastic cuts to the ailing groundfishery, amid impassioned testimony from fishermen who said the deep cuts would spell the end of their livelihood.

"[The fishery] has been declared a disaster . . . this will make it a reality," said Frank Mirarchi, a Scituate draggerman. "This means the boats will fail and the families will fail. This will be the end of an era." Mr. Mirarchi was referring to a proposal on the table to cut the catch allotments for cod and yellowtail flounder by as much as 80 per cent. The proposal follows the formal declaration of the groundfishery as a federal disaster by the acting U.S. Secretary of Commerce in September. The declaration is expected to lead to relief funding from the federal government in the coming year for the fishery.

Stock assessments for New England groundfish are at an all-time low, and fishery managers say drastic action is needed.

But during a daylong meeting of the council Thursday in Wakefield, the latest assessments came under blunt questioning by fishermen.

The meeting was broadcast live on the web.

"I have tried desperately to put faith in the science. I don't have the faith now. I wish I did," said Christopher Brown, president of the Rhode Island Commercial Fishermen's Association. "The last straw was a week ago when Doug Butterworth, [who was hired by the fishing industry to represent it and dispute the recent stock assessments] was bullied. He was harassed and distracted . . . it was beyond contempt."

Dr. William (Bill) Karp, science and research director of the Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, apologized for the treatment of Mr. Butterworth. "It is not acceptable to me as it is not acceptable to you. The lack of respect, the lack of respect. It is something that I will continue to follow up," Mr. Karp said.

Nevertheless the Woods Hole scientist said he strongly backs the position that yellowtail flounder are in trouble.

"It is true for these stocks and other stocks," Mr. Karp said. "We have to look for a better way," he said, calling for some kind of method to integrate the assessments of fishermen who are out on the water every day with the scientific assessments of stocks, taken through samplings at sea and computer modeling.

Read the full story at the Martha's Vineyard Gazette>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 10/21/14

In this episode:

North Pacific Council adjusts observer program
Fishermen: bluefin fishing best in 10 years
Catch limit raised for Bristol Bay red king crab
Canadian fishermen fight over lobster size rules
River conference addresses Dead Zone cleanup

National Fisherman Live: 10/7/14

In this episode, National Fisherman Publisher Jerry Fraser talks about the 1929 dragger Vandal.

 

Inside the Industry

NOAA and its fellow Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have announced the signing of a formal Record of Decision to implement a gulf restoration plan. The 44 projects, totaling an estimated $627 million, will restore barrier islands, shorelines, dunes, underwater grasses and oyster beds.

Read more...

The Golden Gate Salmon Association will host its 4th Annual Marin County Dinner at Marin Catholic High School, 675 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Kentfield on Friday, Oct 10, with doors opening at 5:30 p.m.

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