National Fisherman


PORTLAND, Maine — Top lobster scientists are meeting to look at fundamental changes that have affected lobsters in recent years after a summer that featured a potentially record-breaking haul in Maine and Canada and a crash in wholesale prices.

The Maine Sea Grant program at the University of Maine is hosting a conference in Portland beginning Tuesday focusing on issues such as warming ocean temperatures, the changing food web, and seafood economics. About 135 people have registered, including scientists from the United States, Canada, and Europe; regulators; and industry representatives.

The conference comes when the Maine harvest is going gangbusters, the southern New England fishery has virtually collapsed, and ocean temperatures are warming, which could have a profound effect on the lobster population, said symposium cochairman Rick Wahle, a University of Maine research professor.

"Lobsters have the potential to be a sort of poster child for climate change impact and the impacts of human activity," Wahle said.

Read the full story at Boston Globe

Inside the Industry

The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation announced last week the sixth round of grant awards from its Fisheries Innovation Fund, a program launched in 2010 to foster innovations that support sustainable fisheries in the United States. 

The goal of the Fisheries Innovation Fund is to sustain fishermen and fishing communities while simultaneously rebuilding fish stocks.

Read more...

Alaskan Leader Fisheries will give Inmarsat’s new high-speed broadband maritime communications service, Fleet Xpress, a try on the 150-foot longline cod catcher/processor Alaskan Leader.

Read more...

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