National Fisherman


Thousands of fishing traps are lost or abandoned each year in United States waters, including the Florida Keys, but continue still to catch marine life such as spiny lobster.
 
These ghost, or derelict traps, result in the death of spiny lobsters and losses to habitat and fisheries. The losses also trickle down to watermen, according to a recently published National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) study.
 
The study, which took place between 2007 and 2010, showed that each ghost trap in Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary results in the deaths of 10 spiny lobsters a year. It did not give an exact number for the amount of such traps that currently reside on the Florida Keys sea floor and the possible financial impact on local fisheries.
 
The study stated that "once traps stop ghost fishing, they may remain intact for long periods of time before degrading."
 
Read the full story at Keys News>>
 
Want to read more about ghost traps? Click here

Inside the Industry

The Downeast Salmon Federation has received a major grant from the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities to ensure and improve the water quality of eastern Maine’s most important rivers, according to the Ellsworth American.

Read more...

Louisiana crab fishermen and their catch are feeling the pressure of a downturn in the state economy, and a resulting upturn of people entering the fishery.

“It’s a crazy business right now,” said Pete Gerica, the New Orleans fisherman who now serves as president or the Louisiana Crab Task Force, a legislatively-created board of industry voices that makes recommendations to state government.

Read more...

Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email