National Fisherman


There's something idyllic about watching shrimp boats drag their nets in the Gulf of Mexico or wedge through the nickel-gray waters of Galveston harbor, pelicans perched regally on their bows, circled by seagulls, trailed by dolphins. Trawlers at docks or in sunset silhouettes give visitors a sense of the place they may have imagined when they booked their seaside escapes. The boats also offer glimpses of a traditional way of life and an industry built largely by European immigrants; the last traces of it, perhaps.

Shrimp boats around the county are the nearest many tourists will ever get to a class of people who for years have risen long before the sun to ply their trade chasing a product that is the staple of many a Gulf Coast meal. What they catch make their way to bait shops, seafood markets, restaurants and home kitchens, and into our gumbos, fried seafood platters and ceviche.

Shrimp is the favorite seafood among U.S. consumers, many of whom know little about how the tasty crustaceans landed on their plates.

"People go to a restaurant and eat shrimp and think it's so easy to catch them," said Johnny Marullo, captain of the Rock Bottom, which docks at Pier 19 in Galveston's harbor.

But making a living off the shrimp isn't easy these days and hasn't been for years, Marullo said.

Read the full story at Galveston County Daily News>>

Want to read more about Texas shrimp fishing? Click here...

Inside the Industry

NOAA recently published a proposed rule that would implement a traceability plan to help combat IUU fishing. The program would seek to trace the origins of imported seafood by setting up reporting and filing procedures for products entering the U.S.

The traceability program would collect data on harvest, landing, and chain of custody of fish and fish products that have been identified as particularly vulnerable to IUU fishing and fraud.

Read more...

The following was released by the Maine Department of Marine Resources on Jan. 22:

The Maine Department of Marine Resources announced an emergency regulation that will support the continued rebuilding effort in Maine’s scallop fishery. The rule, effective January 23, 2016, will close the Muscle Ridge Area near South Thomaston and the Western Penobscot Bay Area.

Read more...
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