National Fisherman


A federal agency said Friday it is taking another look at releasing water in Northern California's Klamath Basin to prevent the spread of disease among salmon returning to spawn in drought conditions.

A decision is likely next week following discussions with fisheries biologists and others, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation spokeswoman Janet Sierztutowski said from Sacramento, California.

The bureau previously denied a request from the Hoopa Valley Tribe to release water from Lewiston Dam on the Trinity River to prevent the spread of a parasite that attacks salmon in stagnant water, though the bureau said it would release some water if significant numbers of fish started dying.

Tribal scientists have said it would be too late by then. The idea is that higher flows make it more difficult for the parasite to swim. Once a significant number of fish are attacked, there is no stopping the parasite, known as Ich, short for Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, scientists said.

Read more at TriCities.com>>

Want to read more about the drought and the Klamath River? Click here...

Inside the Industry

Legislators from Connecticut and Massachusetts complained about the current “out-of-date allocation formula” in black sea bass, summer flounder and scup fisheries in a letter to the U.S. Department of Commerce earlier this week.

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The Southeast Alaska Fishermen’s Alliance recently announced that the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation has awarded the organization a Hollings Grant to reduce whale entanglements in Alaska salmon fisheries by increasing the use of acoustic whale pingers to minimize entanglements in fishing gear.

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