National Fisherman

Salmon live interesting lives: they are born in fresh water, then migrate to the ocean, where they grow to maturity, returning back to fresh water to breed, sometimes hundreds of kilometres, navigating obstacles along the way -- including swimming up waterfalls. And not just any freshwater will do, either: salmon return to the very spot they were born to lay their own spawn.

Artificial water constructions -- such as dams -- can therefore pose a serious problem. Fish can become disoriented, or get injured or killed due to turbines or spillways, and their travel times can get longer due to the disruption of natural water flow. One solution is the fish ladder, a structure that is designed to help migratory fish negotiate the changed waterways.

Or you could just fire them through a cannon.

Thus the salmon cannon was born -- the invention of a Whooshh Innovations, a company who had developed a method of gently and quickly transporting fruit over long distances via a tube. When the team discovered that hydroelectric dams were causing migrating salmon significant difficulties, they decided to adapt the tube to fish.

Read the full story at CNET>>

Want to read more about salmon and dams? Click here...

Inside the Industry

NMFS has awarded 16 grants totaling more than $2.5 million as part of its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

The program supports the development of technological solutions and changes in fishing practices designed to minimize bycatch and aims to to find creative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch, seabird interactions, and post-release mortality in federally managed fisheries.


Abe Williams, who was elected to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association board last spring, has been selected as the new president as of September.

Williams fishes the F/V Crimson Fury, and is president of Nuna Resources, a nonprofit that supports sustainable resource development in rural Alaska, including fighting for an international solution to issues raised by the proposed Pebble Mine project.

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