National Fisherman

Oyster harvests in some parts of the Gulf of Mexico are at about a third of the level they were before the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon disaster and oil spill, the Associated Press reported.
Harvests rebounded slightly last year, but are again much lower than before the spill in the oyster beds that got the worst of the oil during the 87-day spill.
Scientists are still studying whether there is a conclusive link between the spill and the oyster decline, or if it’s related to other changes in the water, weather, overfishing or other factors.
A BP spokesman told AP that multiple government studies have shown that any dropoffs were not due to the explosion that killed 11 people or the spill that followed.
Read the full story at The Hill>>
Want to read more about the BP oil spill? Click here

Inside the Industry

NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.


A new study has identified a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on.

Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species,  allowing responders to act faster to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

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