National Fisherman

Dealing with drought is wet work.

Wading knee deep beneath drizzling skies, wildlife officials and volunteers worked Tuesday to rescue fish running out of water.

The operation by the Nevada Department of Wildlife was staged to save fish from Reno diversion ditches that will soon go dry after the flow of water from a diminished Truckee River was cut off due to the drought.

"We're trying to make sure the fish in there get a second chance," said Chris Healy, spokesman for the Department of Wildlife. "Nobody likes to see a natural resource go to waste. We would have seen a lot of fish go to waste."

Some 25 wader-clad rescuers splashed through ditches used to divert river water for power generation at hydroelectric plants operated by the Truckee Meadows Water Authority, which recently shut off flow into the ditches from the river.

Fish – including some pretty sizable brown and rainbow trout – mountain whitefish and minnows were shocked by backpack "electro-fishers," scooped out of the water by net and deposited into truck-borne fish tanks. Some 3,000 fish salvaged Tuesday will be put in the Truckee River near Verdi, in part because recent rains have benefitted river flows. Others will likely be planted in Marilyn's Pond at Galena Creek Regional Park.

Read the full story at the Reno Gazette-Journal>>

Want to read more about the drought? Click here...

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 11/06/14

In this episode:

NOAA report touts 2013 landings, value increases
Panama fines GM salmon company Aquabounty
Gulf council passes Reef Fish Amendment 40
Maine elver quota cut by 2,000 pounds
Offshore mussel farm would be East Coast’s first

 

Inside the Industry

EAST SAND ISLAND, Oregon—Alexa Piggott is crawling through a dark, dusty, narrow tunnel on this 62-acre island at the mouth of the Columbia River. On the ground above her head sit thousands of seabirds. Piggott, a crew leader with Bird Research Northwest, is headed for an observation blind from which she'll be able to count them.
 
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NOAA and its fellow Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have announced the signing of a formal Record of Decision to implement a gulf restoration plan. The 44 projects, totaling an estimated $627 million, will restore barrier islands, shorelines, dunes, underwater grasses and oyster beds.

Read more...

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