National Fisherman

TRURO, Mass. - It is summer on Cape Cod. The weather is warm, the beaches are crowded. And the seafood? They're fighting over it.
On a typical summer afternoon off the coast of Cape Cod, nearly 1,000 gray seals sunbathe on a sandbar.
A few years ago, this would have been unbelievable. By the 1960s, the seals were hunted close to extinction, the result of a $5 bounty by the state in an attempt to eliminate an animal many considered a pest to fishermen.
But in 1972, Congress passed the Marine Mammal Protection Act and scientists hoped the seals would rebound.
Mike Giblin is a volunteer with the National Park Service. .
"This week in particular, it's definitely the most (seals) we've seen," he said.
Read the full story at CBS>>
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Inside the Industry

NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.


A new study has identified a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on.

Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species,  allowing responders to act faster to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

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