National Fisherman


TRURO, Mass. - It is summer on Cape Cod. The weather is warm, the beaches are crowded. And the seafood? They're fighting over it.
 
On a typical summer afternoon off the coast of Cape Cod, nearly 1,000 gray seals sunbathe on a sandbar.
 
A few years ago, this would have been unbelievable. By the 1960s, the seals were hunted close to extinction, the result of a $5 bounty by the state in an attempt to eliminate an animal many considered a pest to fishermen.
 
But in 1972, Congress passed the Marine Mammal Protection Act and scientists hoped the seals would rebound.
 
Mike Giblin is a volunteer with the National Park Service. .
 
"This week in particular, it's definitely the most (seals) we've seen," he said.
 
Read the full story at CBS>>
 
Want to read more about seals? Click here...

Inside the Industry

The Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association released their board of directors election results last week.

The BBRSDA’s member-elected volunteer board provides financial and policy guidance for the association and oversees its management. Through their service, BBRSDA board members help determine the future of one of the world’s most dynamic commercial fisheries.

Read more...

Former Massachusetts state fishery scientist Steven Correia received the New England Fishery Management Council’s Janice Plante Award of Excellence for 2016 at its meeting last week.

Correia was employed by the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries for over 30 years.

Read more...
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