National Fisherman


PORT OF BROWNSVILLE — Like hunters anxiously awaiting the start of deer season, shrimp boats from Louisiana, Alabama and Mississippi recently converged near the mouth of the Rio Grande along the southern Gulf Coast.
 
They were there to join local shrimpers for the opening of the Texas shrimp harvest season, according to Tony Reisinger, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service agent for coastal and marine resources in Cameron County.
 
The shrimping business is competitive, financially risky and highly dangerous for crew members, Reisinger said, as he boarded vessels to help shrimpers stay compliant with federal rules and regulations.
 
“The traffic of shrimp boats trawling out there in the Gulf will be extremely heavy,” he said. “The payoff can be big if the catch is large and market prices are high, but the investment is very steep. And commercial fishing is the second most dangerous occupation, next to logging.”
 
Read the full story at Valley Morning Star>>

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Inside the Industry

Legislators from Connecticut and Massachusetts complained about the current “out-of-date allocation formula” in black sea bass, summer flounder and scup fisheries in a letter to the U.S. Department of Commerce earlier this week.

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The Southeast Alaska Fishermen’s Alliance recently announced that the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation has awarded the organization a Hollings Grant to reduce whale entanglements in Alaska salmon fisheries by increasing the use of acoustic whale pingers to minimize entanglements in fishing gear.

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