National Fisherman

When preparing and serving bluefin tuna, TJ Ott is a minimalist.
The captain of the fishing boat Hot Tuna and mainstay of National Geographic Channel’s unscripted Sunday hit “Wicked Tuna” prefers his tuna raw, thank you very much, with a little soy and wasabe on the side.
But if he must apply heat, he does so sparingly.
“What we like to do,” explains Ott, a native of Broad Channel in Queens, N.Y., “is take probably inch and a half steaks and we’ll coat it with sesame oil and then we’ll coat them with some black and white sesame seed, put a little bit of sesame oil in the pan and get it really, really red hot and just sear it really quick on both sides.”
Read the full story at Longview News-Journal>>
Want to read more about Wicked Tuna? Click here

Inside the Industry

NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.


A new study has identified a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on.

Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species,  allowing responders to act faster to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
U.S. Canada Other

Postal/ Zip Code
© 2015 Diversified Business Communications
Diversified Business Communications