National Fisherman

Why are we importing our own fish? That’s the question posed by Paul Greenberg, author of the bestselling “Four Fish,” in a recent New York Times Op-Ed. The query also served to underscore an issue that many people were totally unaware of.
 
The U.S. controls more fishable ocean than any other nation, Greenberg writes, and yet most of what we eat — a full 86 percent — is imported. Meanwhile, a third of our own catch is shipped out to other countries. In many cases, we’re exchanging high-quality, sustainable wild fish for farmed Asian alternatives. Even more bizarrely, we send some fish, like pollock and salmon, halfway around the world only to have it processed in Asia and then shipped right back to us.
 
It’s easy to throw your hands up in exasperation at the Rube Goldberg-esque complexities of a globalized marketplace; the next step is to seriously consider the larger implications of a system run amok, and to make a convincing case for simplification and reform. ”American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood” is Greenberg’s attempt to do all of the above. By charting the evolution of the seafood chain as it’s now experienced and detailing the long list of what we’ve lost in the process, his new book calls for a food movement that would boost the profile of protein source that’s long played second fiddle to land-raised meat in the American diet, and return our gazes to the fish swimming closer to our own shores.
 
Read the full story at Salon>>

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National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker is required by state statute to appoint someone to the Board of Fisheries by today, Tuesday, May 19. However, his efforts to fill the seat have gone unfulfilled since he took office in January. The seven-member board serves as an in-state fishery management council for fisheries in state waters.

The resignation of Walker’s director of Boards and Commissions, Karen Gillis, fanned the flames of controversy late last week.

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Keith Decker, president and COO of High Liner Foods, will take over for the outgoing CEO, Harry Demone, who will assume the role as chairman of the board of directors. The Lunenburg, Nova Scotia-based seafood supplier boasts sales in excess of $310 million (American) for the first quarter of the year.

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