National Fisherman

BALTIMORE (WJZ) — In perfect conditions, oysters raise themselves. But in parts of the bay, they need hands-on human help.
Alex DeMetrick reports it works, even in some of the state’s most troubled water.
A bucket brigade formed at Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, passing some hand-raised baby oysters. They had their start early last fall, when volunteers built cages, filled them with old shells with tiny oyster spat attached and then dropped them off docks scattered around the Inner Harbor to grow. Not the best water for marine life.
But in these buckets, over 20,000 oysters survived to make the trip to better water and a man-made reef outside the Key Bridge off-limits to harvesting.
Read the full story at WJZ-TV>>

Inside the Industry

The Center for Coastal Studies recently announced that Owen Nichols, Director of the Center for Coastal Studies’ Marine Fisheries Research Program, has been selected as this year’s recipient of the John Annala Fishery Leadership Award by the Gulf of Maine Research Institute. 

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Cummins  announced the opening of a new Alaska service location on Kodiak Island last week that will serve as a service and support location for commercial marine applications.

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