National Fisherman

"All the empty shells are the oysters that have died," Captain Ed Farley says. "But we do have some live oysters mixed in here." Farley bends to sort through the oysters on the deck of his skipjack, the H.M. Krentz. "This oyster bed," he tells the tourists assembled in front of him, "died in 1985 from the parasites that wiped out the rest of the area."

A middle-aged travel agent from New Jersey named Lori Zimmerman asks, "Don't they know how to manage the parasite?"

Farley fixes her with a stare. "We haven't learned how to manage the common cold, have we?" he asks.

Zimmerman looks abashed.

"The answer's no," Farley says.

"Yeah, okay."

Farley, perhaps recognizing his gruffness, launches into a scientific explanation of the parasite that destroyed this bed.

When you begin a new career at 61, you're bound to hit snags.

Farley is building a tourism business around his expertise in the Chesapeake Bay. After a winter spent oystering, Farley fills his summer with educational sailing tours on his historic skipjack. This sail-powered oystering boat is part of a rapidly dissolving fleet; with only 23 still in the water, he says, a mere six skipjacks continue to oyster. The dwindling fleet was designated one of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places in 2002.

Read the full story at Washington Post>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 9/23/14

In this episode:

'Injection' plan to save fall run salmon
Proposed fishing rule to protect seabirds
Council, White House talk monument expansion
Louisiana shrimpers hurt by price drop
Maine and New Hampshire fish numbers down

 

Inside the Industry

The Golden Gate Salmon Association will host its 4th Annual Marin County Dinner at Marin Catholic High School, 675 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Kentfield on Friday, Oct 10, with doors opening at 5:30 p.m.

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The Maine Lobster Marketing Collaborative is introducing its Chef Ambassador Program. Created to inspire and educate chefs and home cooks across the country about the unique qualities of lobster from Maine, the program showcases how it can be incorporated into a range of inspired culinary dishes.

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