National Fisherman


Soaring demand in recent years for young American eels, which are often shipped to Asian markets to be raised for food, has generated fresh concern about the health of the species along the East Coast.
 
Last week the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and state investigators searched several locations from Maine to South Carolina as part of an investigation into the illegal eel trade, a law-enforcement official said. Young eels—known as elvers, or glass eels, because of their transparent appearance—are transported overseas to mature in aquaculture ponds.
 
Operation Broken Glass is examining possible violations of federal export law, said Col. Joe Fessenden, chief of marine law enforcement at Maine's Department of Marine Resources.
 
Read the full story at the Wall Street Journal>>

Inside the Industry

The Southeast Alaska Fishermen’s Alliance recently announced that the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation has awarded the organization a Hollings Grant to reduce whale entanglements in Alaska salmon fisheries by increasing the use of acoustic whale pingers to minimize entanglements in fishing gear.

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Last week, Alaska senators Lisa Murkowski (R), Dan Sullivan (R) and Rep. Don Young (R) asked Secretary of State John Kerry to negotiate with Canadian leaders to make sure appropriate environmental safeguards are in place for mine development in Southeast Alaska.

The congressional delegation explained the importance of this issue to Alaskans and the need for assurances that the water quality in transboundary waters between Alaska and Canada will be maintained.

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