National Fisherman


FOR CENTURIES, Louisiana fishermen thrived off the bounty found in the extremely fertile coastal waters nourished by the Mississippi, Atchafalaya and other rivers.
 
According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Louisiana produces more than 76 percent of all seafood coming from the Gulf of Mexico and 34 percent of the total from the contiguous United States, landings worth about $2.5 billion annually. Shrimp typically account for more than 60 percent of Louisiana seafood harvests.
 
Consistently leading the nation, Louisiana shrimpers traditionally catch 45 percent of the Gulf landings and 29 percent of the national total. In 2012, Louisiana shrimpers landed 100.4 million pounds.
 
These numbers come despite shrimpers facing enormous problems during the past 10 years. Several hurricanes between 2005 and 2012 devastated the shrimping fleet. In 2010, just as the industry began to recover from the storms, a massive Gulf oil spill shut down fishing in many areas. Some areas remain off limits. In addition, competition from foreign imports, rising fuel prices and federal regulations makes life tough for shrimpers. Many shrimpers, some following traditions going back several generations, called it quits in recent years.
 
“My grandfather started shrimping in a sailing schooner before he had an engine on his boat,” says Clint Guidry of Lafitte, president and CEO of the 600-member Louisiana Shrimping Association. “My dad was a shrimper all his life. I did it on and off for all of my 65 years. From 2003 to 2009, Louisiana lost 75 percent of its offshore shrimping fleet and 40 percent of the inshore fleet. We’ve been through a lot in the past 10 years, but we’re still here.”
 
Read the full story at My New Orleans>>

Inside the Industry

Ray Hilborn, a University of Washington professor of aquatic and fishery sciences, recently received the 2016 International Fisheries Science Prize at the World Fisheries Congress in Busan, South Korea.

The award was given to Hilborn by the World Council of Fisheries Societies’ International Fisheries Science Prize Committee in recognition of his 40-year career of “highly diversified research and publication in support of global fisheries science and conservation.”

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Legislators from Connecticut and Massachusetts complained about the current “out-of-date allocation formula” in black sea bass, summer flounder and scup fisheries in a letter to the U.S. Department of Commerce earlier this week.

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