National Fisherman

Biologists this week helped 54,000 Northern California salmon become San Joaquin River inhabitants — launching the river's largest experiment to rejuvenate a long-dead salmon run.
 
As part of the nearly 5-year-old San Joaquin restoration project, half of the juvenile fish will be released today for a long, dangerous swim to the Pacific Ocean. The other half will be released Friday.
 
The fish are tagged so survivors can be identified in a few years on the return trip to the San Joaquin for spawning.
 
"This is a big step for the project," said biologist John Netto of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. "We're coordinating the right window of opportunity to get the fish down the river."
 
The San Joaquin's first large-scale reintroduction of spring-run salmon faces hurdles — the driest season in decades, a long truck trip from Friant Dam to the confluence with the Merced River and potentially lethal warm water.
 
The salmon restoration is part of a 2006 agreement that ended a long-running environmental lawsuit. Environmentalists sought to reconnect a 60-mile section of dried-out river with the ocean six decades after Friant Dam was built.
 
Read the full story at the Fresno Bee>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

The New England Fishery Management Council  is soliciting applications for seats on the Northeast Trawl Survey Advisory Panel and the deadline to apply is July 31 at 5:00 p.m.

The panel will consist of 16 members including members of the councils and the Atlantic States Fishery Commission, industry experts, non-federal scientists and Northeast Fisheries Science Center scientists. Panel members are expected to serve for three years.

Read more...

Commercial salmon fishermen will have 12 hours to fish Oregon's lower Columbia River, starting at 7 p.m. tonight.

Biologists upgraded their forecast for the summer king run to 120,000, the largest since at least 1960.

Read more...
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