National Fisherman

Biologists this week helped 54,000 Northern California salmon become San Joaquin River inhabitants — launching the river's largest experiment to rejuvenate a long-dead salmon run.
As part of the nearly 5-year-old San Joaquin restoration project, half of the juvenile fish will be released today for a long, dangerous swim to the Pacific Ocean. The other half will be released Friday.
The fish are tagged so survivors can be identified in a few years on the return trip to the San Joaquin for spawning.
"This is a big step for the project," said biologist John Netto of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. "We're coordinating the right window of opportunity to get the fish down the river."
The San Joaquin's first large-scale reintroduction of spring-run salmon faces hurdles — the driest season in decades, a long truck trip from Friant Dam to the confluence with the Merced River and potentially lethal warm water.
The salmon restoration is part of a 2006 agreement that ended a long-running environmental lawsuit. Environmentalists sought to reconnect a 60-mile section of dried-out river with the ocean six decades after Friant Dam was built.
Read the full story at the Fresno Bee>>

Inside the Industry

Abe Williams, who was elected to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association board last spring, has been selected as the new president as of September.

Williams fishes the F/V Crimson Fury, and is president of Nuna Resources, a nonprofit that supports sustainable resource development in rural Alaska, including fighting for an international solution to issues raised by the proposed Pebble Mine project.


The Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi is teaming up with leading shark-tracking nonprofit Ocearch to build the most extensive shark-tagging program in the Gulf of Mexico region.

In October, Ocearch is bringing its unique research vessel, the M/V Ocearch, to the gulf for a multi-species study to generate previously unattainable data on critical shark species, including hammerhead, tiger and mako sharks.

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