National Fisherman

Don't expect to find genetically modified salmon — or any other engineered fish or meat — on store shelves anytime soon.
 
The Obama administration has stalled for more than four years on deciding whether to approve a fast-growing salmon that would be the first genetically modified animal approved for human consumption.
 
During that time, opponents of the technology have taken advantage of increasing consumer concern about genetically modified foods and urged several major retailers not to sell it. So far, two of the nation's biggest grocers, Safeway and Kroger, have pledged to keep the salmon off their shelves if it is approved.
 
Proponents of genetically engineered fish and meat say they expect Food and Drug Administration approval of the salmon and still hope to find a market for it. However, the retailers' caution and lengthy regulatory delays have made investors skittish.
 
"The FDA delay has caused developers to take a pause," says Dr. David Edwards of the Biotechnology Industry Organization, the main industry group for genetically engineered agriculture. "They're not really sure where to go as far as the regulatory system."
 
By altering genetic materials of animals, scientists have proposed — and in some cases actually created — animals that would be bred to be free of diseases, be cleaner in their environment or grow more efficiently. Think chickens bred to resist avian flu, "Enviropigs" whose manure doesn't pollute as much or cattle bred without horns so they don't have to be taken off during slaughter.
 
But where the scientists see huge opportunity, critics see a food supply put at risk. They say modified organisms can escape into the wild or mingle with native species, with unknown effects.
 
Read the full story at ABC News>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 9/9/14

In this episode:

Seafood Watch upgrades status of 21 fish species
Calif. bill attacking seafood mislabeling approved
Ballot item would protect Bristol Bay salmon
NOAA closes cod, yellowtail fishing areas
Pacific panel halves young bluefin harvest

National Fisherman Live: 8/26/14

In this episode, National Fisherman Publisher Jerry Fraser talks about his early days dragging for redfish on the Vandal.

Inside the Industry

More than a dozen higher education institutions and federal and local fishery management agencies and organizations in American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and Hawaii have signed a memorandum of understanding aimed at building the capacity of the U.S. Pacific Island territories to manage their fisheries and fishery-related resources.

Read more...

PORTLAND, Maine – The Maine Lobster Marketing Collaborative has appointed Matt Jacobson as its new executive director.
 
Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email