National Fisherman


ANCHORAGE -
 
Twenty-five years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill, one state lawmaker is accusing ExxonMobil of not living up to its promise of restoring Prince William Sound in the disaster’s wake -- a claim the company contests.
 
A 2010 study commissioned by the state shows herring and some species of birds are among those animals that have not recovered from the 1989 spill.
 
ExxonMobil paid billions to make the state whole again after the crisis, and the energy giant says it's gone above and beyond the terms reached in its settlement -- but some say that is not enough.
 
Life along the sound still hasn’t returned to its former routine a quarter century after the March 24, 1989 spill – for neither residents nor animals.
 
"It bothers me if there are impacts that are caused to our oceans, to our ecosystems, our communities, that haven't been paid in full," said Michael Levine, the chief counsel for environmental group Oceana.
 
According to Levine, years of studies prove the area still hasn't recovered from the spill. Oceana, an international ocean conservation group, has been gathering data from scientists who worked on the aftermath of the spill.
 
“One of the important species that have not recovered is the herring in Prince William Sound, and those herring are the base of the food chain,” Levine said. “They are really important to the health and function of the ecosystem in Prince William Sound.”
 
Read the full story at KTUU>>

Inside the Industry

The following was released by the Maine Department of Marine Resources on Jan. 22:

The Maine Department of Marine Resources announced an emergency regulation that will support the continued rebuilding effort in Maine’s scallop fishery. The rule, effective January 23, 2016, will close the Muscle Ridge Area near South Thomaston and the Western Penobscot Bay Area.

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Louisiana’s Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, which governs commercial and recreational fishing in the state, got a new boss in January. Charlie Melancon, a former member of the U.S. House of Representatives and state legislator, was appointed to the job by the state’s new governor, John Bel Edwards.

Although much of his non-political work in the past has centered on the state’s sugar cane industry, Melancon said he is confident that other experience, including working closely with fishermen when in Congress, has prepared him well for this new challenge.

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