National Fisherman

Twenty-five years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill, one state lawmaker is accusing ExxonMobil of not living up to its promise of restoring Prince William Sound in the disaster’s wake -- a claim the company contests.
A 2010 study commissioned by the state shows herring and some species of birds are among those animals that have not recovered from the 1989 spill.
ExxonMobil paid billions to make the state whole again after the crisis, and the energy giant says it's gone above and beyond the terms reached in its settlement -- but some say that is not enough.
Life along the sound still hasn’t returned to its former routine a quarter century after the March 24, 1989 spill – for neither residents nor animals.
"It bothers me if there are impacts that are caused to our oceans, to our ecosystems, our communities, that haven't been paid in full," said Michael Levine, the chief counsel for environmental group Oceana.
According to Levine, years of studies prove the area still hasn't recovered from the spill. Oceana, an international ocean conservation group, has been gathering data from scientists who worked on the aftermath of the spill.
“One of the important species that have not recovered is the herring in Prince William Sound, and those herring are the base of the food chain,” Levine said. “They are really important to the health and function of the ecosystem in Prince William Sound.”
Read the full story at KTUU>>

Inside the Industry

NMFS has awarded 16 grants totaling more than $2.5 million as part of its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

The program supports the development of technological solutions and changes in fishing practices designed to minimize bycatch and aims to to find creative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch, seabird interactions, and post-release mortality in federally managed fisheries.


Abe Williams, who was elected to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association board last spring, has been selected as the new president as of September.

Williams fishes the F/V Crimson Fury, and is president of Nuna Resources, a nonprofit that supports sustainable resource development in rural Alaska, including fighting for an international solution to issues raised by the proposed Pebble Mine project.

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