National Fisherman

When the Cape Dorset started taking on water off the coast of Newfoundland last weekend, search and rescue crews were dispatched, but it was a group of Nova Scotia fishermen who actually rescued the crew of 20 in high winds and rough seas.
Having spent more than three decades on the water, Wesley Henneberry is no stranger to rough seas.
He and the crew of the Ivy Rose rescued the 20-man crew, battling strong winds and high seas.
 "It could have been worse; it could have been the night before,” says shipmate Phillip Ryan.
"Sea conditions were 35-40 feet or more, if it had happened then, probably would have been a loss of life or whatever,” adds Henneberry.
Henneberry's crew says their captain did a great job during the rescue, keeping everything organized and making sure everyone got onboard their ship safely. But Henneberry says all the credit goes to the captain of the Cape Dorset.
Read the full story at CTV News>>

Inside the Industry

NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.


A new study has identified a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on.

Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species,  allowing responders to act faster to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
U.S. Canada Other

Postal/ Zip Code
© 2015 Diversified Business Communications
Diversified Business Communications