National Fisherman

Jim Lichatowich would argue that predictions about "record" runs of salmon returning to the Columbia River this fall aren't telling the whole story. Runs of hatchery salmon go up and down from year to year, he points out — but none in recent decades equal the bounty of fish that swam up the river before European settlers arrived with their fishing fleets and, later, their dams.

Lichatowich (pronounced Lick-aTAU-witch) pokes many holes in contemporary fish management policies in his new book, "Salmon, People, and Place: A Biologist's Search for Salmon Recovery." The book provides insights into the challenges fish biologists face as they try to rebuild salmon and steelhead runs. It's also a thoughtful examination of the politics of fish management from someone who knows it from the inside.

Lichatowich, 73, spent 19 years working for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, rising to become assistant director for fisheries. The trained scientist found that his views clashed with ODFW internal politics, however, so Lichatowich quit and got a job as a habitat biologist for the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe on the Olympic Peninsula. Over the past 25 years, he's worked as a consultant and served on several scientific advisory panels to fishery managers, as evidenced by numerous certificates in the office of his home in Columbia City, Ore.

He's come to this conclusion: "In spite of the billion-plus dollars spent on salmon recovery in the Columbia River in the last 25 years, the ecosystem that once supported annual salmon runs of 10 to 15 million fish is impoverished and its supposed replacement — an industrial production system (hatcheries) — is mired in failure."

Read the full story at The Daily News>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 11/06/14

In this episode:

NOAA report touts 2013 landings, value increases
Panama fines GM salmon company Aquabounty
Gulf council passes Reef Fish Amendment 40
Maine elver quota cut by 2,000 pounds
Offshore mussel farm would be East Coast’s first

 

Inside the Industry

EAST SAND ISLAND, Oregon—Alexa Piggott is crawling through a dark, dusty, narrow tunnel on this 62-acre island at the mouth of the Columbia River. On the ground above her head sit thousands of seabirds. Piggott, a crew leader with Bird Research Northwest, is headed for an observation blind from which she'll be able to count them.
 
Read more...

NOAA and its fellow Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have announced the signing of a formal Record of Decision to implement a gulf restoration plan. The 44 projects, totaling an estimated $627 million, will restore barrier islands, shorelines, dunes, underwater grasses and oyster beds.

Read more...

Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email