National Fisherman

Jim Lichatowich would argue that predictions about "record" runs of salmon returning to the Columbia River this fall aren't telling the whole story. Runs of hatchery salmon go up and down from year to year, he points out — but none in recent decades equal the bounty of fish that swam up the river before European settlers arrived with their fishing fleets and, later, their dams.

Lichatowich (pronounced Lick-aTAU-witch) pokes many holes in contemporary fish management policies in his new book, "Salmon, People, and Place: A Biologist's Search for Salmon Recovery." The book provides insights into the challenges fish biologists face as they try to rebuild salmon and steelhead runs. It's also a thoughtful examination of the politics of fish management from someone who knows it from the inside.

Lichatowich, 73, spent 19 years working for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, rising to become assistant director for fisheries. The trained scientist found that his views clashed with ODFW internal politics, however, so Lichatowich quit and got a job as a habitat biologist for the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe on the Olympic Peninsula. Over the past 25 years, he's worked as a consultant and served on several scientific advisory panels to fishery managers, as evidenced by numerous certificates in the office of his home in Columbia City, Ore.

He's come to this conclusion: "In spite of the billion-plus dollars spent on salmon recovery in the Columbia River in the last 25 years, the ecosystem that once supported annual salmon runs of 10 to 15 million fish is impoverished and its supposed replacement — an industrial production system (hatcheries) — is mired in failure."

Read the full story at The Daily News>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

The New England Fishery Management Council  is soliciting applications for seats on the Northeast Trawl Survey Advisory Panel and the deadline to apply is July 31 at 5:00 p.m.

The panel will consist of 16 members including members of the Councils and the Atlantic States Fishery Commission, industry experts, non-federal scientists and Northeast Fisheries Science Center scientists. Panel members are expected to serve for three years.

Read more...

Commercial salmon fishermen will have 12 hours to fish Oregon's lower Columbia River, starting at 7 p.m. tonight.

Biologists upgraded their forecast for the summer king run to 120,000, the largest since at least 1960.

Read more...
Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email