National Fisherman

ANCHORAGE — New rules to protect king salmon returning to Kenai Peninsula rivers unfairly target commercial fishermen, they said Wednesday after the Alaska Board of Fisheries approved the measures.
Jim Butler, a commercial set-net fisherman and a representative of the Kenai Peninsula Fishermen’s Association, said the loss of fishing opportunity will not be equally shared with anglers.
“There has been nothing in the river that been changed except ‘not-bait,’” he told the Peninsula Clarion ( “There’s been not one less motorboat day, not one less drift boat day, there has been no limitation on the number of hours the commercial guide industry fishes.”
The Fish Board, meeting in Anchorage, voted 6-1 in favor of “paired restrictions” for late-run king salmon returning in July. State fish managers will have the power to reduce both sport and commercial fishing in Cook Inlet when king salmon return numbers look low, the Anchorage Daily News reported.
For example, river anglers in private boats or boats with guides could be prohibited from using bait. That would kick in restrictions on nets used by set-netters, the commercial fishermen who stretch gill nets perpendicular to ocean beaches near rivers to intercept returning salmon.
Set-netters target sockeye salmon but catch an estimated 13 percent of the returning kings.
Fish managers could also require in-river anglers to catch and release kings. Under the new rules, commercial set-net fishermen would then be limited to one 12-hour fishing period per week instead of two.
King salmon are a huge draw for the peninsula’s tourism industry, attracting anglers who support lodges, restaurants and guides. Sport fishing interests had pushed for the paired restrictions.
Read the full story at the Juneau Empire>>

Inside the Industry

NMFS has awarded 16 grants totaling more than $2.5 million as part of its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

The program supports the development of technological solutions and changes in fishing practices designed to minimize bycatch and aims to to find creative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch, seabird interactions, and post-release mortality in federally managed fisheries.


Abe Williams, who was elected to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association board last spring, has been selected as the new president as of September.

Williams fishes the F/V Crimson Fury, and is president of Nuna Resources, a nonprofit that supports sustainable resource development in rural Alaska, including fighting for an international solution to issues raised by the proposed Pebble Mine project.

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