National Fisherman

The latest version of the federal operating plan for the Columbia and Snake rivers is déjà vu all over again for many of the parties wondering what would emerge from a 2011 court order to try again, and report back in 2014.
 
Earlier this month the Fisheries Service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration was back with a plan that says continued reliance on habitat and tributary improvements would ensure the survival of salmon and steelhead species in the Columbia River system.
 
The point of the biological opinion is to make sure that operation of the dams and the federal power system do not compromise fish survival.
 
U.S. District Court Judge James Redden, who had knocked down three earlier versions of the plan, rejected the 2011 plan because it put the economic interests of river operations above saving endangered fish. The plan was too narrowly centered on habitat mitigation, and lacked reliable, aggressive actions, the judge ruled.
 
One of those points was additional flow over the dams in the spring and summer to help scoot salmon safely toward the ocean.
 
Critics of the latest plan, including Joseph Bogaard, executive director of Save Our Wild Salmon Coalition, do not see a robust role for spill in the new plan.
 
In 2011, Redden said the plan was adequate for the near term, but not through the life of the plan, through 2018. He wanted hard and fast plans and measurable results.
 
Read the full story at the Seattle Times>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

Commercial salmon fishermen will have 12 hours to fish Oregon's lower Columbia River, starting at 7 p.m. tonight.

Biologists upgraded their forecast for the summer king run to 120,000, the largest since at least 1960.

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Newburyport, Mass. - The Northeast Consortium, a University of New Hampshire-based institution established in 1999 to foster collaborative research, under contract to the New England Fishery Management Council, announces funding for three new research projects that will focus on spawning groundfish in waters off the New England coast.

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