National Fisherman

Long Island lobstermen still reeling from a historic closure of Long Island Sound last fall won a victory Wednesday after a state committee declined to put new restrictions on the harvest of a vital alternative species known as whelk.
 
At a meeting of the Marine Resources Advisory Council in Setauket, board members voted against putting size restrictions on the harvest of whelk, a large snaillike creature also referred to locally as conch. Lobstermen have turned to whelk to make up lost income as the population of lobsters has sharply declined in the waters around Long Island.
 
Last fall, the state Department of Environmental Conservation, acting on a mandate from federal fisheries regulators, closed the Sound to lobstering from Sept. 8 to Nov. 28, for the first time. The measure is expected to be continued annually until the lobster population rebounds.
 
John German, president of the Long Island Sound Lobsterman's Association and a longtime lobsterman, argued against the proposed conch rules, saying lobstermen were suffering enough.
 
"They closed me out of lobstering with a moratorium in the fall that took away 25 to 30 percent of my income," he said. "Now they're trying to ram this [whelk restriction] through here, and there's no data to support it."
 
Read the full story at Newsday>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 11/06/14

In this episode:

NOAA report touts 2013 landings, value increases
Panama fines GM salmon company Aquabounty
Gulf council passes Reef Fish Amendment 40
Maine elver quota cut by 2,000 pounds
Offshore mussel farm would be East Coast’s first

 

Inside the Industry

Fishermen in Western Australia captured astonishing footage this week as a five-meter-long great white shark tried to steal their catch, ramming into the side of their boat.
 
Read more...
EAST SAND ISLAND, Oregon—Alexa Piggott is crawling through a dark, dusty, narrow tunnel on this 62-acre island at the mouth of the Columbia River. On the ground above her head sit thousands of seabirds. Piggott, a crew leader with Bird Research Northwest, is headed for an observation blind from which she'll be able to count them.
 
Read more...
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