National Fisherman

The news that a congressional spending bill bears $75 million in fisheries disaster aid — and may get both House and Senate approval today — provides welcome tidings for the fishing industry.
And the fact that the House bill now in play on Capitol Hill rightfully keeps NOAA’s Northeast regional administration in Gloucester — albeit under the new, more fitting name of the Greater Atlantic Fisheries Office — represents an important relief for Cape Ann’s economy as well.
Now, however, the important thing is for lawmakers to ensure that this aid, desperately needed by so many fishermen and families to stabilize the boats, businesses and their way of life, gets into their hands as soon as possible heading into a new fishing year starting May 1.
That means that the Department of Commerce — governmental parent of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the agency entrusted with this planned allocation — should immediately move toward distributing the money through the states, to be parceled out perhaps based on the number of commercial permits and fishermen working the seas.
Yes, the aid is facing approval late in the game — an absurd 16 months after the Department of Commerce declared the Northeast groundfishery, including Gloucester, a full-fledged “economic disaster,” and nine months after NOAA’s cuts of up to 78 percent in landing limits made things even worse than that.
Read the full story at the Gloucester Daily Times>>

Inside the Industry

The anti-mining group Salmon Beyond Borders expressed disappointment and dismay last week at Alaska Governor Bill Walker’s announcement that he has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with B.C. Premier Christy Clark.

This came just days after his administration asked members of his newly-formed Transboundary Rivers Citizens Advisory Work Group to provide comment on a Draft Statement of Cooperation associated with Transboundary mining.


NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.

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