National Fisherman

The possible future of South Florida fishing rules, including the latest information on Goliath grouper populations, goes before combined panels of federal and state fishery experts convening Jan. 7-9 in Key Largo.
 
“This is really interesting stuff,” said Robert Mahood, executive director of the federal South Atlantic Fishery Management Council.
 
Board members and staff from the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council and the South Atlantic Council, along with Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission scientists and managers, will consider possible ways to streamline fishing regulations specifically for South Florida waters.
 
“We’ve talked for years about trying to coordinate regulations in Florida. This is part of that,” Mahood said.
 
“If you drive down U.S. 1 in the Keys, you might legally catch a snapper on one side of a bridge,” he said. “But if you take it across the road to your car, you may be breaking the law.”
 
The two federal councils and the FWC formed the Joint Council on South Florida Management Issues, which meets at the Hilton Key Largo. Five council members or staff members who serve on the South Florida committee also sit on the Goliath Grouper Joint Council Steering Committee, which holds a meeting during the Key Largo trip. John Sanchez, a former Florida Keys commercial fishing executive, represents the Gulf Council on both committees.
 
“There’s been a lot of interest, especially from the Gulf side where they’re seeing more (Goliath grouper), in reopening that fishery,” Mahood said. It has been nearly a quarter of a century since a ban on legally harvesting a Goliath grouper — then known as a jewfish — was enacted in 1990.
 
Read the full story at Bradenton Herald>>

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 11/06/14

In this episode:

NOAA report touts 2013 landings, value increases
Panama fines GM salmon company Aquabounty
Gulf council passes Reef Fish Amendment 40
Maine elver quota cut by 2,000 pounds
Offshore mussel farm would be East Coast’s first

 

Inside the Industry

Fishermen in Western Australia captured astonishing footage this week as a five-meter-long great white shark tried to steal their catch, ramming into the side of their boat.
 
Read more...
EAST SAND ISLAND, Oregon—Alexa Piggott is crawling through a dark, dusty, narrow tunnel on this 62-acre island at the mouth of the Columbia River. On the ground above her head sit thousands of seabirds. Piggott, a crew leader with Bird Research Northwest, is headed for an observation blind from which she'll be able to count them.
 
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